Archive for: Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights


Traditionally, climate funders and policy makers have not integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) within their strategies. The aim of this guide is to support more SRHR organisations and advocates to engage in climate change advocacy, to secure climate finance and to develop stronger partnerships with those already working on the connections between climate change and SRHR.

Year: 2022

Source: Margaret Pyke Trust, MSI Reproductive Choices, YADNET-Uganda, PHE Ethiopia Consortium

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Climate resilience and gender equality are inextricably linked, and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are an essential element of gender equality. How can we ensure that climate action works hand in hand with efforts to realize SRHR? This website provides an interactive and visual experience to breaking down these questions.

Year: 2021

Source: Women Deliver, NAP Global Network, International Institute for Sustainable Development

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Governments around the world are advancing their National Adaptation Plan (NAP) processes in an effort to build resilience to the negative impacts of climate change. With increased attention to gender issues in adaptation action comes an opportunity to ensure that NAP processes take sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) issues into consideration.

This report explores the extent to which NAP processes recognize the linkages between climate change adaptation and the realization of SRHR, including maternal and newborn health, voluntary modern contraception, and gender-based violence. It draws on analysis of 19 NAP documents submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change by low- and medium- income countries, a sample of sector-specific NAPs for the health sector, and a selection of funding proposals for adaptation planning support from the Green Climate Fund.

The analysis presented in this report explores the extent to which NAP processes recognize the impacts of climate change on SRHR, as well as how gaps in realization of SRHR exacerbate vulnerability to climate change. It aims to promote an integrated and inclusive approach that moves countries forward on the mutually supportive objectives of resilience to climate change and realization of SRHR. The report is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Year: 2021

Source: Women Deliver, NAP Global Network

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This issue brief, first published ahead of COP26 underscores why climate change, gender equality, and SRHR are linked, and reinforces why SRHR must be considered a key component of climate adaptation, resilience action, and climate justice.

Year: 2021

Source: Women & Gender Constituency, SRHR and Climate Justice Coalition

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Climate change disproportionately threatens the most vulnerable girls and women, in all their intersecting identities, and has detrimental effects on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). This infographic highlights some of the ways that climate change affects SRHR, why this matters, and what steps must be taken for climate adaptation and resilience and to advance SRHR. A rights-based and intersectional approach to SRHR realization should be part of any and all climate change adaptation measures in order to ensure a healthy, empowered population, including women, girls, and young people. The United Kingdom Foreign, Commonwealth and Development OfficeFP2030, the UNFCCC Gender Secretariat, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and Women Deliver developed this infographic, which accompanies the webinar, “Building Forward Better: Advancing SRHR for Climate Adaptation and Resilience.” Available in English, French, and Spanish.

Year: 2021

Source: Women Deliver

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The aim of this guide is to outline the unmet need for family planning that exists in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, highlight the barriers to accessing and using family planning that exist for many girls and women, explain why conservation organizations are uniquely placed to introduce such activities to the communities they work with, and provide guidance for any organization that wishes to start a program to tackle this issue. It is based on CHASE Africa’s experience over the past ten years of supporting local partners to run, and in several cases set-up, community health and family planning programs in Kenya and Uganda. While some of the guidance is context specific, the guide highlights how programs could be adapted to other situations and circumstances.

Year: 2021

Source: CHASE Africa

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This video illustrates strategies for family planning and reproductive health program implementers and advocates to position their programs to access climate adaptation funding. A virtual watch party and workshop in April 2022 showcased the video and provided an opportunity for implementers and advocates to explore how to apply each of the strategies to their programming with advice from key experts.

Related materials: Policy Brief

Year: 2022

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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Discussions around climate change and sexual and reproductive health rarely occur in the same spaces, despite ever growing evidence showing that they should. Climate change threatens human health and rights—and has a disproportionate effect on the most vulnerable girls and women, in all their intersecting identities. True climate justice is not possible without considering gender equality—and true gender equality is only possible when sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are fully realized. To be ready to deliver in a crisis, governments, donors, and development actors need to lead emergency preparedness for SRHR.

Ahead of COP26, the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, this timely virtual event convened a diverse group of member states, UN entities, civil society organizations, and other key stakeholders to drive evidence-based dialogue and critical action on the under-discussed yet urgent need to integrate SRHR in gender responsive strategies to adapt to climate change.

Year: 2021

Source: FP2030

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Simply put, climate change is caused by excessive production of green-house gases. As highlighted by the late Professor Tony McMichael, the “cause(s) of the causes” should not be overlooked. With climate change already close to an irreversible tipping point, urgent action is needed to reduce not only our mean (carbon) footprints but also the “number of feet”—that is, the growing population either already creating large footprints or aspiring to do so. Wise and compassionate promotion of contraceptive care and education in a rights based, culturally appropriate framework offers a cost effective strategy to reduce greenhouse gases. This article outlines the evidence for voluntary accessible family planning as a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change.

Year: 2016

Source: British Medical Journal

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    Research suggests that the scale of human population and the current pace of its growth contribute substantially to the loss of biological diversity. Although technological change and unequal consumption inextricably mingle with demographic impacts on the environment, the needs of all human beings—especially for food—imply that projected population growth will undermine protection of the natural world. Numerous solutions have been proposed to boost food production while protecting biodiversity, but alone these proposals are unlikely to staunch biodiversity loss. An important approach to sustaining biodiversity and human well-being is through actions that can slow and eventually reverse population growth: investing in universal access to reproductive health services and contraceptive technologies, advancing women’s education, and achieving gender equality.

    Year: 2017

    Source: Science

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