Archive for: Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights


This video illustrates strategies for family planning and reproductive health program implementers and advocates to position their programs to access climate adaptation funding. A virtual watch party and workshop in April 2022 showcased the video and provided an opportunity for implementers and advocates to explore how to apply each of the strategies to their programming with advice from key experts.

Related materials: Policy Brief

Year: 2022

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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Discussions around climate change and sexual and reproductive health rarely occur in the same spaces, despite ever growing evidence showing that they should. Climate change threatens human health and rights—and has a disproportionate effect on the most vulnerable girls and women, in all their intersecting identities. True climate justice is not possible without considering gender equality—and true gender equality is only possible when sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are fully realized. To be ready to deliver in a crisis, governments, donors, and development actors need to lead emergency preparedness for SRHR.

Ahead of COP26, the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, this timely virtual event convened a diverse group of member states, UN entities, civil society organizations, and other key stakeholders to drive evidence-based dialogue and critical action on the under-discussed yet urgent need to integrate SRHR in gender responsive strategies to adapt to climate change.

Year: 2021

Source: FP2030

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Simply put, climate change is caused by excessive production of green-house gases. As highlighted by the late Professor Tony McMichael, the “cause(s) of the causes” should not be overlooked. With climate change already close to an irreversible tipping point, urgent action is needed to reduce not only our mean (carbon) footprints but also the “number of feet”—that is, the growing population either already creating large footprints or aspiring to do so. Wise and compassionate promotion of contraceptive care and education in a rights based, culturally appropriate framework offers a cost effective strategy to reduce greenhouse gases. This article outlines the evidence for voluntary accessible family planning as a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change.

Year: 2016

Source: British Medical Journal

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    Research suggests that the scale of human population and the current pace of its growth contribute substantially to the loss of biological diversity. Although technological change and unequal consumption inextricably mingle with demographic impacts on the environment, the needs of all human beings—especially for food—imply that projected population growth will undermine protection of the natural world. Numerous solutions have been proposed to boost food production while protecting biodiversity, but alone these proposals are unlikely to staunch biodiversity loss. An important approach to sustaining biodiversity and human well-being is through actions that can slow and eventually reverse population growth: investing in universal access to reproductive health services and contraceptive technologies, advancing women’s education, and achieving gender equality.

    Year: 2017

    Source: Science

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      This 2009 flagship report argues that reproductive health care, including family planning, and gender relations could influence the future course of climate change and affect how humanity adapts to rising seas, worsening storms and severe droughts. Women, especially impoverished women in developing countries, bear the disproportionate burden of climate change, but are often largely overlooked in the debate about how to address problems of rising seas, droughts, melting glaciers and extreme weather. The report cites research demonstrating women’s higher vulnerability in natural disasters—especially where incomes are low and status differences between men and women are high. The international community’s fight against climate change is more likely to be successful if policies, programmes and treaties take into account the needs, rights and potential of women. The report shows that investments that empower women and girls—particularly education and health—bolster economic development, reduce poverty, and have a beneficial impact on climate change.

      Year: 2009

      Source: United Nations Population Fund

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        This article suggests that sexual and reproductive health and rights activists seeking to influence the post-2015 international development paradigm must work with sustainable development advocates concerned with a range of issues, including climate change, environmental issues, and food and water security, and that a way of building bridges with these communities is to demonstrate how sexual and reproductive health and rights are relevant for these issues. An understanding of population dynamics, including urbanization and migration, as well as population growth, can help to clarify these links. This article therefore suggests that whether or not sexual and reproductive health and rights activists can overcome resistance to discussing “population”, become more knowledgeable about other sustainable development issues, and work with others in those fields to advance the global sustainable development agenda are crucial questions for the coming months. The article also contends that it is possible to care about population dynamics (including ageing and problems faced by countries with a high proportion of young people) and care about human rights at the same time. It expresses concern that, if sexual and reproductive health and rights advocates do not participate in the population dynamics discourse, the field will be left free for those for whom respecting and protecting rights may be less of a priority.

        Year: 2014

        Source: Reproductive Health Matters

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          This manual was developed to train individuals to integrate community-based family planning and health into PHE projects through community-based distribution and peer education. The curriculum shows how community-based distributors (CBDs) and Peer Educators (PEs) can be trained to discuss basic ecology, PHE linkages, and reproductive health/family planning within a PHE context. The modules include international family planning norms and guidance on sexually-transmitted infections/diseases. This training was field-tested in Tanzania, Zambia and Ethiopia. It is best for: 1) training-of-trainers events where facilitators learn how to train PHE CBDs and PHE Adult PEs on community-based education and distribution of family planning methods within the context of an integrated PHE intervention; and 2) workshops where local trained facilitators train PHE CBDs and PHE Adult PEs who work on integrated PHE activities.

          Year: 2011

          Source: The BALANCED Project

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            This report describes the results of a 2007 evaluation of WWF (World Wildlife Fund) PHE (Population, Health and Environment) projects sponsored by Johnson & Johnson and USAID (the U.S. Agency for International Development). The PHE sites were located in Africa and Asia, where human-environment interactions are in constant flux, human populations are growing rapidly, and they depend most directly on and affect most profoundly some of the richest forest and marine ecosystems on Earth. The PHE projects facilitated basic health care and RH (reproductive health) provision with the working thesis that improving human health and environmental conservation jointly adds value to each independently. The report also recommends future actions on sustainability and scale up of PHE approaches, improved data collection and monitoring and technical support.

            Year: 2008

            Source: World Wildlife Fund

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              This guide was adapted from the Youth Sexuality, Reproductive Health and Environmental Education: Training Manual for Youth Peer Educators developed by PATH Foundation Philippines Inc. (PFPI) under its Integrated Population and Coastal Resources Management (IPOPCORM) initiative and other resources. It incorporates international family planning norms and guidance on sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), including the Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (WHO 2004), Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (WHO/RHR and JHU/CCP 2007), Contraceptive Technology (Hatcher et al. 2007), and Sexually Transmitted and Other Reproductive Tract Infections: A Guide to Essential Practice (WHO 2005).

              Year: 2011

              Source: The BALANCED Project

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                This training guide was developed to train population, health and environment (PHE) Community-based Distributors (CBDs) who work on integrated PHE activities. A PHE CBD is someone who is trained to provide information on PHE, family planning (FP) methods, and the stocking and sales of FP commodities. This training guide can be used to train new PHE CBDs over a two-day period. It contains 12 modules covering basic topics that PHE CBDs need to know to discuss basic ecology, PHE linkages, and reproductive health/family planning with community members within a PHE context. The modules are based on international norms and guidance as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). This Guide is based on the publication “Population, Health and Environment (PHE) Community-based Distribution and Peer Education System: Train-the-Trainer Guide for Training PHE Community-based Distributors and PHE Adult Peer Educators,” which is geared for training master trainers who will, in turn, train PHE adult peer educators and PHE CBDs.

                Year: 2012

                Source: The BALANCED Project

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