Archive for: Adaptation


Women’s Role in Adapting to Climate Change and Variability

Women are engaged in more climate-related change activities than is often recognized. This article highlights women’s important role in the adaptation of and search for safer communities, which leads them to understand better the causes and consequences of changes in climatic conditions. It is concluded that women have important knowledge and skills for orienting the adaptation processes, a product of their roles in society (productive, reproductive and community). In addition, the importance of gender equity in these processes is recognized. The relationship among climate change, climate variability and the accomplishment of the Millennium Development Goals is also considered.

Year: 2008

Source: Advances in GeoSciences

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    Vulnerability and Resilience in the Face of Climate Change: Current Research and Needs for Population Information

    Research on vulnerability and resilience is rooted in the common-sense observation that similar climate events can produce very different levels of socioeconomic impact, depending not only on the location and timing of occurrence, but also the resources and agility of the societies who experience climate change impacts. The degree of impact depends on the ways in which the natural triggering event interacts with particular ecosystems and with the specific characteristics of the society affected, including its level of economic development; the types of livelihoods of its members; education levels; and other factors that generally determine both how resilient the affected population is as well as what resources are available for adaptation. This paper addresses four related topics: (1) varying definitions of vulnerability and resilience (and, to a lesser extent, adaptive capacity) and the implications of those differences for societal analysis, (2) candidate approaches to characterizing societal resilience to climate change, (3) methods for assessing resilience, and (4) the potential contribution of a richer understanding of affected populations to the study of resilience.

    Year: 2009

    Source: PAI | Battelle

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      The Role of Community-Based Coastal Conservation and Development Initiatives in Building Social-Ecological Resilience to Climate Change: Experiences From Southern Madagascar

      Climate change impacts fall disproportionately on the world’s poorest, most marginalized communities, particularly those highly dependent on direct use of natural resources, such as subsistence fishing communities. Vulnerability to climate change involves social and ecological factors, and efforts to reduce it and build long-term resilience must target both. In Madagascar national and international planning to address vulnerability remains vague and indeterminate for most of the island’s coastal communities, with little meaningful implementation. Therefore, local measures to build resilience and adaptive capacity are critical to ensure that communities are able to cope with the immediate and long-term effects of climate change. This article examines a PHE program in Madagascar, and illustrates how practical initiatives can contribute to building immediate and long-lasting resilience and adaptive capacity. These approaches could play a key role in adaptation measures within the western Indian Ocean region, where many coastal communities live in severe poverty on the front line of a rapidly changing climate.

      Year: 2013

      Source: Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science

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        Linking Population, Fertility and Family Planning with Adaptation to Climate Change: Views from Ethiopia

        The effects of global climate change are being felt disproportionately in the world’s poorest countries, where people are the least able to cope. As climate change adaptation strategies gain international attention, it is important to show how people are dealing with the effects of climate change, how they could become more resilient to these effects, and how people and communities can adapt to climate change. Using qualitative methods, PAI, in collaboration with Miz-Hsab Research Center and the Joint Global Change Research Institute, explored how Ethiopian communities react to and cope with climate variation, which groups are the most vulnerable, what resources communities need to adapt to climate change, and the role of family planning and reproductive health in increasing resilience to climate change impacts. This study was one of the first to explore the linkages of population, fertility and family size with aspects of vulnerability and resilience to climate change.

        Year: 2009

        Source: PAI

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          Gender and Resilience: From Theory to Practice

          This paper synthesizes four case studies from Uganda, Myanmar, Sudan/Chad, and Burkina Faso, documenting strategies towards building gender equality through resilience projects. The purpose is to document how gender inequalities manifest themselves in all four locations; how gender is conceptualised in theories of change (ToCs); the operationalisation of objectives to tackle gender inequalities; internal and external obstacles to the implementation of gender-sensitive activities; and drivers that help NGOs transform gender relations and build resilience. The case studies describe how disasters and climate change affect gender groups and underscore the patriarchal social norms that disproportionately restrict women and girls’ equal access to rights and resources. This paper aims to demonstrate how to draw on promising practices to make resilience projects inclusive and equitable. It also recommends areas where further research could increase understanding of resilience to climate extremes and longer-term changes, and suggests how donors and funding can best support efforts to build communities’ resilience.

          Year: 2016

          Source: The BRACED Project

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            Gender and Climate Change: A Closer Look at Existing Evidence

            Perceiving a gap in the resources available to individuals and organizations concerned about the gendered experiences
 of climate change, GGCA commissioned this literature review in early 2016 in order to provide the most up-to- date assessment of the current evidence base illustrating how vulnerability to climate change and climate adaptation decisions vary by gender. This is designed to serve as a resource highlighting literature addressing a broad array of gender and climate issues affecting vulnerability and adaptation capacity. While this document contains hundreds of references, due to space limitations, it is not able to provide a comprehensive assessment of every topic covered. Readers are directed to the subject-specific references that are contained in many sections of the review, which often contain information on additional research.

            Year: 2016

            Source: Global Gender and Climate Alliance

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              Community Driven Vulnerability Evaluation Tool “CoDriVE-Programme Designer”: A Handbook – Incorporating Vulnerability to Climate Change into Project Design and Implementation

              The purpose of the CoDriVE-PD tool is to enable communities to articulate their experience of how they are being impacted by climatic and non-climatic forces, identify and assess their areas of vulnerability or “development deficits” and encourage them to plan for and undertake adaptive actions to build resilience and reduce vulnerability. CoDriVE-PD is community-engaging, easy-to-use, sensitive enough to capture the different types and degrees of vulnerabilities across communities and regions, and it is oriented towards adaptive action. It has been rigorously tested and validated in different social, economic and agro-ecological contexts in four different Indian states. To support easy, quick, and large-scale application of this tool, Watershed Organization Trust (WOTR) has developed a web-based software program that enables processing and analysis of key data with a view to generating a vulnerability profile as well as situation-specific adaptive actions to be undertaken.

              Year: 2014

              Source: Watershed Organization Trust

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                Building Socio-ecological Resilience to Climate Change through Community-Based Coastal Conservation and Development: Experiences in Southern Madagascar

                Climate change impacts fall disproportionately on the world’s poorest, most marginalised communities, particularly those highly dependent on direct use of natural resources, such as subsistence fishing communities. Vulnerability to climate change involves social and ecological factors, and efforts to reduce it and build long-term resilience must target both. In Madagascar, generalised strategies developed at the national level address vulnerability, adding to a variety of international initiatives. Yet, such high-level planning inevitably remains vague and indeterminate for most of the island’s coastal communities, with little meaningful implementation on the ground. Therefore, local measures to build resilience and adaptive capacity are critical to ensure that resource-dependent communities are able to cope with the immediate and long-term effects of climate change. Examination of an integrated population-health-environment (PHE) programme in Madagascar, comprising a locally-managed marine area (LMMA) and socio-economic development activities, illustrates how practical initiatives can contribute to building immediate and long-lasting resilience and adaptive capacity. Such community-based approaches should play a key role in adaptation measures within the western Indian Ocean region, where many coastal communities live in severe poverty on the front line of a rapidly changing climate.

                Year: 2012

                Source: Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science

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                  Building Resilience Through Family Planning and Adaptation Finance Webinar

                  The impacts of climate change—climbing temperatures, extreme weather, drought, shifting rainfall patterns, and rising sea levels—are intensifying around the world. These impacts threaten to undo development progress in poor and vulnerable communities, where rapid population growth and unmet need for family planning contribute to limited capacity to adapt. This webinar provides an overview of the climate finance landscape and explore strategies that the family planning community can use to join with others in efforts to build resilience to climate change impacts. Speakers and participants shared views on ways to forge partnerships for multisectoral climate adaptation projects that are eligible for multilateral climate change adaptation funding. Experiences and perspectives shared may also be useful for other organizations seeking to access this type of climate adaptation funding.

                  Year: 2018

                  Source: Population Reference Bureau

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                    Building Resilience Through Family Planning and Adaptation Finance

                    A growing evidence base links women’s met needs for family planning with reduced human vulnerability to climate change and enhanced resilience in the face of climate change impacts. Yet, thus far, population and family planning have been largely left out of adaptation proposals and projects. A new PRB policy brief identifies four key strategies the FP/RH community can use to promote inclusion of family planning in adaptation strategies in ways that build resilience, improve health, and enhance women’s economic empowerment. The policy brief includes an example of how to apply these key strategies to a real-world adaptation initiative, showing how the FP/RH community could seize opportunities created by the importance of adapting to climate change and the growing availability of international climate financing to strengthen prospects for FP/RH’s inclusion in multisectoral adaptation plans.

                    Year: 2018

                    Source: Population Reference Bureau

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