Archive for: Uganda


This study report explores the readiness study on advancing and scaling up sexual reproductive health rights and family planning for climate adaptation and resilience in Uganda. The study aimed at the generation of recommendations and actions for influencing policy and practice for institutionalization and scale up of SRHR/FP into climate actions in Uganda at various scales i.e., national, sub national, local and community.

Year: 2024

Source: Regenerate Africa

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Gender equality is a fundamental human right and an integral part of holistic social and economic growth and development. This noble goal can be achieved through acknowledging the intricate relationship between gender equality, sexual and reproductive health and rights, family planning, health and climate change, the most significant economic and social threat of this century. According to the 2023 Population and Vulnerability report by the Population Institute, Uganda is the 13th amongst the 80 most vulnerable nations in the world facing climate-induced events. They include, but are not limited to, prolonged droughts, floods, landslides, wind storms, hail storms and lightning, whose severity and frequency has increased over the past 10 years. These events are a result of, amongst other things, the unplanned production and consumption patterns occasioned by the demands of a very fast-growing population whose livelihood depends on the climate sensitive sectors. The country is experiencing one of the most rapid population growth rates in the world projected to rise from 48.6 million to date to over 90 million in the next 25 years.

Year: 2023

Source: Regenerate Africa

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This strategic plan outlines a vision for Uganda’s National PHE Network, representing the needs of not just Network member organizations but also those of the wider stakeholder community. It advances the multisectoral integrated PHE approach and offers an opportunity to achieve sustainable development by 2040.

Year: 2021

Source: National Population Council

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In 2022, Knowledge SUCCESS collaborated with 128 Collective (formerly Preston-Werner Ventures) and USAID, to conduct a rapid stock-taking exercise to document the sustained impact of a cross-sectoral integrated Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) project. That exercise resulted in a learning brief that shares the lessons and learnings about scale-up and sustainability of the Health of People and Environment-Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project activities in Kenya and Uganda since project closure in 2019.

Webinar panelists, representing community groups, organizations, networks, and government, shared their unique experiences on how HoPE-LVB activities have continued and been adapted from their perspective.

Year: 2023

Source: Knowledge SUCCESS

Watch the webinar: English | French

The Health of People and Environment–Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE–LVB), a cross-sectoral integrated Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) effort implemented by Pathfinder International and a range of partners in Kenya and Uganda during 2011-2019, aimed to improve interconnected health, environment, and development challenges in an ecologically biodiverse region. After an external evaluation in 2018 documented the results of the project, partners and donors were interested in learning about the ongoing sustainability of the project activities to draw lessons for designing future projects. Therefore in 2022, USAID through the Knowledge SUCCESS project, collaborated with a philanthropic partner, Preston-Werner Ventures, to conduct a rapid stock-taking exercise to explore the successes, challenges, and opportunities in scaling-up and sustaining the cross-sectoral programming. This learning brief features the voices from a range of stakeholders that were involved in the project to share their perspectives and knowledge on the scale-up and sustainability of HoPE-LVB activities.

Year: 2022

Source: Knowledge SUCCESS

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The aim of this guide is to outline the unmet need for family planning that exists in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, highlight the barriers to accessing and using family planning that exist for many girls and women, explain why conservation organizations are uniquely placed to introduce such activities to the communities they work with, and provide guidance for any organization that wishes to start a program to tackle this issue. It is based on CHASE Africa’s experience over the past ten years of supporting local partners to run, and in several cases set-up, community health and family planning programs in Kenya and Uganda. While some of the guidance is context specific, the guide highlights how programs could be adapted to other situations and circumstances.

Year: 2021

Source: CHASE Africa

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The aim of PHE projects is to improve access to reproductive and other health services for vulnerable populations in rural and ecologically threatened areas, while at the same time empowering these communities to manage their natural resources in ways that benefit their livelihoods. By linking these issues, people are increasingly motivated to change behaviors that threaten their health and environment. The PHE approach proposes that close collaboration and coordination across multiple sectors contributes to holistic results—people with improved health outcomes, diversified livelihoods, and stronger, more sustainable ecosystems. This publication features insights from four ongoing PHE projects in East Africa—two led by Pathfinder International and two by Deutsche Stiftung Weltbevölkerung (DSW)—and provides recommendations for those seeking to refine the PHE development framework. The projects described are located in Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya.

Year: 2013

Source: Pathfinder International | DSW

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These stories and photos are from policy makers and champions of an integrated approach to development known as Population, Health, and Environment (PHE), which focuses on the interconnectedness between human health and environmental health. PHE programs improve primary health care services such as family planning and reproductive health, while also helping communities conserve biodiversity, manage natural resources, and develop sustainable livelihoods. When these issues are addressed  simultaneously, communities thrive. This collection highlights the experiences of PHE stakeholders and champions in the Lake Victoria Basin.

The stories are an inspiration to anyone struggling to understand why PHE is important. Any donor or development partner who is looking for reasons to invest in PHE can find answers right here. For program designers and developers of integrated PHE  approaches, this collection provides an overview of key components to consider while designing your package.

Year: 2018

Source: Lake Victoria Basin Commission and the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project

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The purpose of this workshop was to establish and operationalize PHE zones in the Republic of Uganda, with inputs from relevant national stakeholders. Participants included staff from the EAC Secretariat,  representatives from Uganda’s line ministries, various departments and agencies, research institutions; and the organizations Pathfinder International and Conservation Through Public Health. This report outlines the workshop proceedings, including a set of recommendations from the participating stakeholders.

Year: 2016

Source: East African Community

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Population Reference Bureau (PRB) coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment integration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, including identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. An assessment of this “state of integration” was undertaken by an interdisciplinary team led by Pro-Biodiversity Conservationists in Kampala, Uganda, to explore in more detail population-health-environment (PHE) interactions and the opportunities for and challenges of cross-sectoral collaboration and integrated programming in Uganda. This policy brief is based on the Uganda PHE Assessment written by Elady Muyambi of Pro-Biodiversity Conservationists in Uganda, with assistance from members of the Uganda PHE Assessment team. The methods used for this assessment include a review of relevant policies, laws, and project docu-ments; key information interviews; and field visits to case study sites. The Uganda PHE Assessment was made possible with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Year: 2009

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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