Archive for: Economic Development


Makueni County in Kenya’s Lake Victoria Basin is characterized by a rapidly growing population, water scarcity, falling food production,and low resilience to climate change. The combined effects of climate change and rapid population growth are increasing food insecurity, environmental degradation, and poverty levels in the county. Makueni County’s Integrated Development Plan (CIDP) identifies population dynamics, environmental degradation, and climate change as key development challenges. These issues need to be linked in county policies and programs to ensure that projects that address them are implemented jointly. Addressing population growth, environmental degradation, and climate change together should be a top priority if Makueni County is to achieve sustainable development. The county government, donors, and program implementers should develop policies and implement programs that integrate population dynamics, environment/climate change, and development.

Year: 2013

Source: PAI

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Kitui County in Kenya’s Lake Victoria Basin is characterized by a rapidly growing population, water scarcity, falling food production and low resilience to climate change. The combined effects of climate change and rapid population growth are increasing food insecurity, environmental degradation, and poverty levels in the county. The county’s environmental action plan identifies population dynamics, environmental degradation and climate change as key development challenges. These issues need to be linked in county policies and programs to ensure that projects that address them are implemented jointly. Addressing population growth, environmental degradation, and climate change together should be a top priority if Kitui County is to achieve sustainable development. The county government, donors and program implementers should develop policies and implement programs that integrate population dynamics, environment/climate change, and development.

Year: 2013

Source: PAI

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Kisumu County in Kenya’s Lake Victoria Basin is characterized by a rapidly growing population, high population density, water scarcity, falling food production, and low resilience to climate change. The combined effects of climate change and rapid population growth are increasing food insecurity, environmental degradation, and poverty levels in the county. The Kisumu County Integrated Development Plan (CIDP) identifies environmental degradation and climate change as key development challenges, but fails to link them to population dynamics. These issues need to be linked in county policies and programs to ensure that projects that address them are implemented jointly. Addressing population growth, environmental degradation, and climate change together should be a top priority if Kisumu County is to achieve sustainable development. The county government, donors, and program implementers should develop policies and implement programs that integrate population dynamics, environment/climate change, and development.

Year: 2013

Source: PAI

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Homa Bay County is characterized by a rapidly growing population, high population density, falling food production, and low resilience to climate change. The combined effects of climate change and rapid population growth are increasing food insecurity, environmental degradation, and poverty levels in the county. The county’s strategic plan identifies population dynamics, environmental degradation, and climate change as key development challenges. These issues need to be linked in county policies and programs to ensure that projects that address them are implemented jointly. Addressing population growth, environmental degradation, and climate change together should be a top priority if Homa Bay County is to achieve sustainable development. The county government, donors, and program implementers should develop policies and implement programs that integrate population dynamics, environment/climate change, and development.

Year: 2014

Source: PAI

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This report calls on governments, donors, and civil society to invest more in population and climate change work, to address the two issues together in policies and programs, and to build the technical capacity to develop programs and research. Ensuring women in sub-Saharan Africa who wish to avoid pregnancy have access to family planning can reduce population pressures and reduce vulnerability to climate change impacts. It can also help meet other development goals, including reducing poverty and maternal mortality, and improving education.

Year: 2012

Source: PAI | African Institute for Development Policy

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With support from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Population Reference Bureau and Worldwatch Institute assembled a working group of experts from the climate change, family planning, and development assistance communities to examine the complex relationships between population dynamics and climate compatible development. The group’s goal was to identify approaches and opportunities to advance policy dialogue and policy action to include population dynamics, with an emphasis on family planning, into climate compatible development. The action opportunities fall under four strategic approaches which provide a path forward for groups interested in connecting these issues and ensuring that increasing access to family planning is part of efforts to achieve climate compatible development. Linking population, family planning, and climate change is unconventional for many policymakers. Cross-sectoral initiatives that highlight and integrate synergies in development plans and climate finance programs could reap enormous benefits as we tackle climate change.

Year: 2014

Source: Population Reference Bureau | Worldwatch Institute

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Population Reference Bureau (PRB) coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment integration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, including identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. An assessment of this “state of integration” was undertaken by an interdisciplinary team led by Pro-Biodiversity Conservationists in Kampala, Uganda, to explore in more detail population-health-environment (PHE) interactions and the opportunities for and challenges of cross-sectoral collaboration and integrated programming in Uganda. This policy brief is based on the Uganda PHE Assessment written by Elady Muyambi of Pro-Biodiversity Conservationists in Uganda, with assistance from members of the Uganda PHE Assessment team. The methods used for this assessment include a review of relevant policies, laws, and project docu-ments; key information interviews; and field visits to case study sites. The Uganda PHE Assessment was made possible with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Year: 2009

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Rwanda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. Drawing lessons from countries where PHE programs have already been successfully implemented, this brief explores the PHE context, challenges, and opportunities for pursuing an integrated approach to development in Rwanda. The methods used to conduct the assessment in Rwanda included a review of relevant government policies and project documents, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions. Recommendations on the way forward include: carry out an analysis of institutional interest in and capacity for PHE integration; develop a framework for institutional coordination and policy dialogue; develop a multimedia communication strategy; and explore the urban dimension of PHE interactions.

Year: 2009

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Rwanda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. The methods used for this assessment include a review of relevant policies, laws, and project documents; key informant interviews; and field visits to case study sites. The Tanzania PHE Assessment was made possible with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This policy brief is based on the Tanzania PHE Assessment written in 2007 by the late Dr. N.F. Madulu, formerly of the Institute of Resource Assessment (IRA)/University of Dar es Salaam and the members of the Tanzania PHE Assessment team.

Year: 2007

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. The University of Nairobi and the National Coordinating Agency for Population and Development assessed the “state of integration” in Kenya. Findings confirm that these integrated approaches require more planning, coordination, and communication, but still can yield substantial results in the community and environment, including reduced dependence on forest resources, increased food security, cleaner drinking water, and greater access to health services. The assessment found that strong leadership was essential to the community-based PHE project; cross-sectoral interventions can be introduced at different times and at different scales; and that even low-cost interventions can improve the health and well-being of a community. Kenya still lacks clear legal framework and institutional money to initiate PHE policies, but according to this assessment, most development professionals prefer the integrated approach at the community level.

Year: 2007

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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