Archive for: United States Agency for International Development


This report describes the accomplishments and lessons learned by the Environmental Health Project (CDM) as part of the design and implementation of a pilot project to address community health and conservation issues, as requested by USAID/Nepal. The project was devised to build the self-help capacity of CFUGs to implement and sustain integrated approaches to population, health and environment (PHE) that also contribute to sustainable livelihood development. The pilot engaged 114 CFUGs in a variety of PHE advocacy, awareness-raising and service delivery activities during 2006-2008. RIMS-Nepal, WWF-Nepal, and ADRA-Nepal collaborated with CDM on this initiative. The livelihood, health and conservation accomplishments detailed here provide insights and best practices for PHE practitioners.

Year: 2009

Source: United States Agency for International Development | CDM International

Access the resource

The Packard Foundation’s Population-Environment (PE) Initiative, which began in June 2000, placed primary emphasis on supporting projects that integrated conservation and family planning in communities near areas of high biodiversity. It supported leadership development and increased advocacy for and awareness of population-environment linkages. The PE strategy sought to improve the quality of life in focal areas, increase collaboration and leadership on interdisciplinary topics, and used mass media and targeted campaigns to increase the public and policymakers’ awareness of the links and solutions. The review team finalized a report to the Packard Foundation in June, 2005 that covers the three objectives of the Packard Foundation Population-Initiative. This report to USAID provides a more limited assessment of the success of the Packard and USAID-funded field projects with a particular focus on six USAID-funded projects in the Philippines and Madagascar, three of which are co-funded with Packard.
This 2005 project review concentrates on three major questions:
  1. What are the likely long-term impacts of this Initiative on funding and the field of Population-Environment?
  2. What results have been achieved by projects implemented under the Initiative? and
  3. What lessons have been learned that may be of broader use to the Foundation, other donors, and the field as a result of implementing this Initiative?

Year: 2005

Source: United States Agency for International Development | The David and Lucille Packard Foundation

Access the resource

The global PHE community consists of organizations and individuals with a wealth of knowledge and hands-on experience in PHE policy advocacy, operations research and program design and execution. This 2008 document provides detailed information on 15 past projects involving PHE approaches. Each project description explains the development challenges and the approaches taken to address them.

Year: 2008

Source: United States Agency for International Development

Access the resource

USAID commissioned a team to review the SAGUN PHE project in Nepal. In this evaluation, the team identified gaps, opportunities, lessons, and practices specific to the PHE approach. The team gathered with Community Forest User Groups, the Ministry of Health, and various national and international NGOs to discuss these findings in an effort to create a PHE project that would best fit the needs of communities. This report builds off these findings and focuses on PHE recommendations for Nepal moving forward.

Year: 2006

Source: United States Agency for International Development

Access the resource

This report focuses on the results of a USAID/Nepal funded project, Strengthening Actions for Good Governance and Utilization of Natural Resources (SAGUN) in various forested regions of Nepal. An analysis was made of the lessons learned and best practices for applying user-group management to forest conservation. Despite the some political unrest in the country, the assessment group discovered many positive key findings that demonstrated how the Community Forest User Groups (CFUGs) approach works well from all perspectives: improved grassroots-level governance capacity; improved livelihoods empowering and building the capacity of excluded groups and the poor; increased coverage and quality of forests covered, and the biodiversity and organisms protected; and low cost and effectiveness. User groups in forest or buffer zones proved to be a great entry point for integrating forest conservation with other social issues. This report discusses the future of the user group approach, and possibilities of integrating it with PHE, community-based development, or community forest conservation.

Year: 2006

Source: United States Agency for International Development

Access the resource

This highly detailed program design manual begins by describing the evolution of PHE integrated projects, and why they remain relevant. It then lays out critical steps for designing and implementing a PHE project. These steps are not strictly sequential; there is more than one successful way to carry out a project. The steps are provided as a guideline for project designers to determine if they are on the right track. This document also aims to achieve longer and larger success in PHE projects by creating value-added synergies, and including sustainability and scalability in project design. Emphasis is placed on these components as crucial steps to designing a successful integrated project.

Year: 2007

Source: United States Agency for International Development

Access the resource

This report summarizes the results of a five-year population, health, and environment (PHE) program in three environmental corridors and threatened ecosystems in Madagascar. This implementation science research was carried out by the Environmental Health Project (EHP) on behalf of USAID to “determine if activities implemented in an integrated manner achieved better results than if the activities were implemented separately.” The purpose of PHE programs is to target sector-specific projects to foster greater collaboration and amplify the integration of the activities to a more efficient level. The report compares the results from the post-intervention surveys and the baseline surveys to explore the idea that integrated programs are more effective than those with a single-sector approach. In this report 29 PHE indicators are included that clearly show higher outcomes in integrated communities than non-integrated ones.

Year: 2005

Source: USAID | Environmental Health Project

Access the resource

USAID’s Office of Population and Reproductive Health supported the creation of a set of training materials for developing the capacity of field practitioners to design, implement and monitor integrated approaches to Population-Health-Environment (PHE). The materials aim to build country capacity to implement the steps and models outlined in the Integrating Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) Projects: A Programming Manual developed in 2007 (available in this resource). The training materials consist of the following:

Year: 2009

Source: United States Agency for International Development