Archive for: Implementation


This report describes the accomplishments and lessons learned by the Environmental Health Project (CDM) as part of the design and implementation of a pilot project to address community health and conservation issues, as requested by USAID/Nepal. The project was devised to build the self-help capacity of CFUGs to implement and sustain integrated approaches to population, health and environment (PHE) that also contribute to sustainable livelihood development. The pilot engaged 114 CFUGs in a variety of PHE advocacy, awareness-raising and service delivery activities during 2006-2008. RIMS-Nepal, WWF-Nepal, and ADRA-Nepal collaborated with CDM on this initiative. The livelihood, health and conservation accomplishments detailed here provide insights and best practices for PHE practitioners.

Year: 2009

Source: United States Agency for International Development | CDM International

Access the resource

This report was commissioned to address the question of what works and what doesn’t work to make PHE programs successful – the most successful being those with the potential for scale or expansion. Findings were derived from document reviews, web searches and interviews with members of the PHE practice community. The report aims to reveal how PHE has evolved to fill an important gap, i.e., a tested approach to working cross-sectorally that achieves results in multiple domains. Its evolution has been both directed and natural. Direction, and ballast, has come from core funders and a group within the community of practice. “Ground-truthing” has come from the vast array of other practitioners. Integration is not easy but with time, resources and skill, it can be successfully achieved under a variety of conditions. Key factors facilitating success are described within. Under select conditions, the approach can work at scale. What scale is most relevant depends on the conservation goal and human/environment interactions.

Year: 2013

Source: Evaluation and Research Technologies for Health

Access the resource

The integrated Population, Health and Environment (PHE) approach is one of the key solutions to attaining sustainable development in the East Africa region. However, the need for guided PHE programming is a fundamental requirement in order to ensure that integrated services address the needs of communities and gaps in service delivery, hence LVBC produced the PHE Minimum Package of Services. The document is intended to be used by communities, local government level implementers, and stakeholders to plan and set priorities for implementation of PHE activities. It is also a framework for accountability and performance measurement in PHE programming.

Year: 2016

Source: Lake Victoria Basin Commission

Access the resource

The Building Actors and Leaders for Advancing Community Excellence in Development (BALANCED) Project developed this publication to provide field-based practitioners of PHE projects with a comprehensive set of ideas and resources for project implementation, from project design to evaluation. This Guide provides brief explanations and links to tools that are considered most useful to PHE practitioners in different stages of PHE project design and implementation. It draws on best practices and approaches used by nongovernmental organizations implementing PHE projects and the BALANCED Project’s experience developing and assisting other organizations to develop PHE projects in Africa and Asia.

Year: 2013

Source: The BALANCED Project

Access the resource

The purpose of this workshop was to establish and operationalize PHE zones in the Republic of Uganda, with inputs from relevant national stakeholders. Participants included staff from the EAC Secretariat,  representatives from Uganda’s line ministries, various departments and agencies, research institutions; and the organizations Pathfinder International and Conservation Through Public Health. This report outlines the workshop proceedings, including a set of recommendations from the participating stakeholders.

Year: 2016

Source: East African Community

Access the resource

The Uganda National Consultative Meeting was convened in April 2015 to discuss and provide country comments to inform the development of the EAC Regional Integrated PHE Strategy and Implementation Framework (2015-2020). Participants at the meeting included representatives from the EAC Secretariat, representatives from several of Uganda’s Ministries, and civil society organizations such as Pathfinder International, Ecological Christian Organization, and Conservation Through Public Health-Uganda. The meeting was facilitated by the EAC Secretariat, the African Institute for Development Policy, and in-country experts.

Year: 2015

Source: East African Community

Access the resource

This highly detailed program design manual begins by describing the evolution of PHE integrated projects, and why they remain relevant. It then lays out critical steps for designing and implementing a PHE project. These steps are not strictly sequential; there is more than one successful way to carry out a project. The steps are provided as a guideline for project designers to determine if they are on the right track. This document also aims to achieve longer and larger success in PHE projects by creating value-added synergies, and including sustainability and scalability in project design. Emphasis is placed on these components as crucial steps to designing a successful integrated project.

Year: 2007

Source: United States Agency for International Development

Access the resource

Although the potential advantages of linked population and environment programs are increasingly acknowledged, evidence is still limited regarding the feasibility and acceptability of PHE initiatives. In some of the best known PHE models, such as those implemented in the Philippines and Madagascar, health promotion was added to environmental initiatives through the intervention of community health workers. Less is known about the ability of environmental workers to assume a direct role in health promotion. To help fill this evidence gap, the Program Research for Strengthening Services (PROGRESS) project, which was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development to improve access to family planning services, teamed with the Green Belt Movement (GBM), a Kenyan nongovernmental organization dedicated to environmental conservation and community development. PROGRESS and GBM conducted a mixed-methods study to examine the following issues: (1) whether GBM’s frontline environmental outreach workers, known as Green Volunteers, could lead family planning promotion activities and (2) how communities would react to Green Volunteers’ promoting potentially sensitive messages about contraception. We used process monitoring and post-intervention data collection to assess the feasibility and acceptability of Green Volunteers’ implementing a PHE intervention and to explore the potential of this approach for expanding access to family planning information and services. In addition, we examined the costs of the intervention to evaluate affordability.

Year: 2015

Source: International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

Access the resource

This report summarizes the results of a five-year population, health, and environment (PHE) program in three environmental corridors and threatened ecosystems in Madagascar. This implementation science research was carried out by the Environmental Health Project (EHP) on behalf of USAID to “determine if activities implemented in an integrated manner achieved better results than if the activities were implemented separately.” The purpose of PHE programs is to target sector-specific projects to foster greater collaboration and amplify the integration of the activities to a more efficient level. The report compares the results from the post-intervention surveys and the baseline surveys to explore the idea that integrated programs are more effective than those with a single-sector approach. In this report 29 PHE indicators are included that clearly show higher outcomes in integrated communities than non-integrated ones.

Year: 2005

Source: USAID | Environmental Health Project

Access the resource

The first PHE workshop for Tanzania and other East African countries was held in June 2005 in Kigoma. It was jointly hosted by EngenderHealth/ACQUIRE Project and JGI/TACARE Project, and attended by 45 participants from East Africa and Madagascar. The goals of the workshop were to: (1) develop both a conceptual framework for PHE integration and an implementation strategy, and (2) develop a clear definition of the programmatic value-added and expected outcomes from implementing an integrated PHE approach. Workshop discussions focused on four areas: justifying, explaining, and clarifying the rationale and concepts that underlie PHE integration; receiving and discussing local and international (mainly Madagascar) experiences, including past, current and planned activities and case studies to illustrate and confirm the practical feasibility of PHE integration programs; practicing application of the theoretical and field experiences through small working group sessions; and discussing and clarifying plans for follow-up actions to move PHE integration forward in Tanzania and beyond.

Year: 2005

Source: EngenderHealth | Jane Goodall Institute

Access the resource