Archive for: Evaluation and Research Technologies for Health


This report was commissioned to address the question of what works and what doesn’t work to make PHE programs successful – the most successful being those with the potential for scale or expansion. Findings were derived from document reviews, web searches and interviews with members of the PHE practice community. The report aims to reveal how PHE has evolved to fill an important gap, i.e., a tested approach to working cross-sectorally that achieves results in multiple domains. Its evolution has been both directed and natural. Direction, and ballast, has come from core funders and a group within the community of practice. “Ground-truthing” has come from the vast array of other practitioners. Integration is not easy but with time, resources and skill, it can be successfully achieved under a variety of conditions. Key factors facilitating success are described within. Under select conditions, the approach can work at scale. What scale is most relevant depends on the conservation goal and human/environment interactions.

Year: 2013

Source: Evaluation and Research Technologies for Health

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This report documents the process through which a Ugandan conservation organization, Conservation through Public Health (CTPH), successfully integrated interventions traditionally seen as from different “domains” or “sectors” for the dual purposes of (1) reducing threats to mountain gorillas and their habitat and (2) improving the well-being of local communities directly dependent upon the health of the former (for ecotourism and natural resource use). CTPH received guidance from JSI in integrating family planning (FP) services to a quality standard, and increasing awareness of and demand for services among rural communities. This report describes activities undertaken between Oct 2006 and December 2008 and key results. It ends with an assessment of the potential for replication to increase coverage around this important Ugandan and World Heritage conservation area. Also presented are some lessons learned applicable to other initiatives aimed at extending access to FP around remote, biodiversity-priority areas and conserving the world’s biological richness.

Year: 2010

Source: John Snow, Inc. | Conservation Through Public Health | Evaluation and Research Technologies for Health

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Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park, known historically for its biodiversity, was devastated by years of war. To help restore the park to its former state, in 2008, the Gregory Carr Foundation entered into a 20-year agreement with the Mozambique government via the Gorongosa Restoration Project. Key objectives were: protection of the Park’s biodiversity and natural ecosystem processes, and poverty alleviation through ecotourism and other Park benefits. An underlying assumption was that a healthy ecosystem would provide the foundation for economic and social development. An Ecohealth program was incorporated to address health problems contributing to poverty. With support from USAID and Mt Sinai Hospital, an integrated (PHE) package of services was provided including family planning/reproductive health and maternal and child health interventions. In 2012, a midterm evaluation was commissioned by USAID to assess the extent to which Ecohealth was reaching its objectives and to identify “best practices” for replication and sharing with other integrated efforts worldwide.

Year: 2013

Source: Evaluation and Research Technologies for Health

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