Archive for: Case Study


Scaling up Population and Environment Approaches in Madagascar: A Case Study

Much has been written on the history of and factors affecting environment sector successes and challenges in Madagascar. This case study focuses specifically on how the conservation sector has engaged in identifying and addressing unmet need for family planning (FP) in Madagascar over approximately two decades (1988 –2007), in the context of improving local livelihoods and reducing pressures on the country’s dwindling natural resource base including its unique biodiversity. It looks at how previous andongoing efforts linking or integrating population and environment (PE) efforts have been and are being scaled up past the site level. The purpose of this study is to highlight drivers of change, constraints and enabling factors to help explain the history and to identify strategies that may be replicable or newly applied elsewhere in-country or outside. This case study is designed to help answer the question: How can the conservation community further contribute to meeting unmet need for family planning in order to reduce future pressure on natural resources and biodiversity and promote more sustainable livelihoods?

Year: 2008

Source: World Wildlife Fund

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    Scaling Up Community Forest Enterprises in Tanzania

    Across the globe, locally controlled forestry is gaining momentum, increasingly recognised for improving environmental resource management and bringing socio-economic returns to local communities. In short: it works for both people and forests. Since the 1990s, Tanzania has pioneered locally controlled forestry (also known as African participatory forest management). Supported by donors and NGOs, the government has transferred management of more than 2.5 million hectares of forest and woodland to local communities, restoring forests and improving environmental services. But converting and scaling up this transfer of natural capital into long-term economic benefits for communities remains a challenge. We present three emerging sustainable community forest enterprises that have delivered important social, economic and conservation benefits, and explore options for scaling up these approaches across Tanzania and elsewhere.

    Year: 2019

    Source: International Institute for Environment and Development

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      Resource Management and Fertility in Mexico’s Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve: Campos, Cash, and Contraception in the Lobster Fishing Village of Punta Allen

      This case study examines the link between marine resource management and the contraceptive use among married couples in the lobster-fishing village of Punta Allen, located in the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Several reasons appear to contribute to small desired and actual family sizes, including a medical clinic staff effective in promoting family planning, cooperative and private resource ownership, changing cultural attitudes, geographical limitations to population and economic growth, and a desire to conserve the environment for aesthetic and economic motives.

      Year: 2008

      Source: Population and Environment

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        Gender and Resilience: From Theory to Practice

        This paper synthesizes four case studies from Uganda, Myanmar, Sudan/Chad, and Burkina Faso, documenting strategies towards building gender equality through resilience projects. The purpose is to document how gender inequalities manifest themselves in all four locations; how gender is conceptualised in theories of change (ToCs); the operationalisation of objectives to tackle gender inequalities; internal and external obstacles to the implementation of gender-sensitive activities; and drivers that help NGOs transform gender relations and build resilience. The case studies describe how disasters and climate change affect gender groups and underscore the patriarchal social norms that disproportionately restrict women and girls’ equal access to rights and resources. This paper aims to demonstrate how to draw on promising practices to make resilience projects inclusive and equitable. It also recommends areas where further research could increase understanding of resilience to climate extremes and longer-term changes, and suggests how donors and funding can best support efforts to build communities’ resilience.

        Year: 2016

        Source: The BRACED Project

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          Family Planning and the Environment: Connected Through Human and Community Well-Being

          This issue of Outlook examines the relationships between family planning and the environment, including key lessons learned from integrated or linked family planning and conservation interventions. The author targets family planning practitioners who are seeking new ways of reframing a fundamental issue – how family planning and the environment relate within the context of well-being and promoting social equity. Case studies from projects in the Philippines and Uganda demonstrate the possibilities and challenges of operationally linking family planning and environmental interventions on the ground.

          Year: 2010

          Source: PATH | Outlook

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            Enlisting Organizational Support for Population, Health, and Environment: Perspectives From a Microfinance Institution

            This case study demonstrates how an NGO microfinance institution went from being skeptical to optimistic about innovative approaches to social development in the Philippines. With the prevalence of poverty on the rise in the Philippines, from 37% of the population to 50% in three years, the FCB Foundation, Inc. (FCBFI) was founded as the first microfinance institution in the province of Bohol, as a branch of the First Consolidated Bank. The FCBFI’s mission is to address the social development needs of the population through microcredit programs, aiming to create jobs and expand entrepreneurial activities. But questioning arose that FCBFI had been spreading itself thin across too many development sectors. Integrated population, health, and environment (PHE) approaches were introduced to FCBFI with PATH Foundation Philippines, Inc. (PFPI)’s project, Integrated Population and Coastal Resource Management (IPOPCORM). This gave birth to a partnership between the two organizations.

            Year: 2006

            Source: Population Reference Bureau

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              Engendering Conservation Constituencies: Understanding the Links between Women’s Empowerment and Biodiversity Conservation Outcomes for PHE Programs – WWF-Nepal Case Study

              This WWF-Nepal case study explores the impact of the PHE component of the WWF-Nepal Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) Project on women’s empowerment. The key research questions focus on 1) how PHE activities contribute to women’s empowerment and (2) how empowered women contribute to conservation outcomes. This case study piloted the WWF Women’s Economic, Social and Political Empowerment (WWESPE) Tool. The aim is to help conservation and/or other PHE project staff understand how their PHE (or conservation-only) projects contribute to women’s empowerment and the conservation outcomes and learn how to enhance these women’s empowerment impacts. The case study found that the TAL and TAL-PHE approach helped to advance women’s empowerment and their involvement in conservation in project communities. The report found that the extent and pattern of women’s economic, social and political empowerment varied within project communities, but the use of adult and youth peer educators and inclusion of a gender module in the peer educator trainings successfully contributed to women’s empowerment.

              Year: 2010

              Source: World Wildlife Fund

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                Desk Review of Programs Integrating Family Planning with Food Security and Nutrition

                The USAID Multi-Sectoral Nutrition Strategy 2014­–2025 prioritizes family planning and reproductive health services (FP/RH) as nutrition-sensitive interventions that address the underlying and systemic causes of malnutrition. However, there is limited peer reviewed literature and a dearth of documentation on how to best integrate FP with food security and nutrition programming. To address this gap, FANTA conducted an extensive desk review to identify and synthesize programmatic experiences, including integration models, platforms, contact points, and providers used for integrated service delivery. This report synthesizes learnings from 102 health and multisectoral programs, including a rich set of program examples and three case studies, to illustrate the ways programs integrate family planning with nutrition and food security interventions. A third of the multisectoral programs included in the review and one cast study were PHE programs. The report and brief also include lessons learned, promising practices for programming, and recommendations for USAID.

                Year: 2015

                Source: FHI 360

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                  Building Partnerships with Local Government Units: PHE Programming in the Municipality of Concepcion

                  The sustainability of development programs is a major concern for many nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) involved in program design and implementation. This case study tells how the Philippines country office of Save the Children U.S., a development NGO, established a successful partnership with the local government units of the municipality of Concepcion to ensure that integrated population-health-environment (PHE) programming would be mainstreamed and sustained within local government activities after Save the Children’s involvement ended in the municipality.

                  Year: 2006

                  Source: Population Reference Bureau

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                    Bringing IPOPCORM to Scale in Coastal Philippines

                    PATH Foundation Philippines, Inc.’s, Integrated Population and Coastal Resource Management Project (IPOPCORM) has been scaled-up in the coastal Philippines. In the Siquijor Province, as IPOPCORM expanded to cover all 6 municipalities, the local Governments decided to incorporate population and reproductive health into coastal resource management legislation. IPOPCORM also experienced success scaling-up in the Danajon Bank Ecosystem, a biodiversity hotspot that experienced a loss of fisheries resources due to a dense population, leading to greater food insecurity. In this case study, IPOPCORM discusses their accomplishments in both regions and how it was achieved.

                    Year: 2006

                    Source: PATH Foundation Philippines Inc.

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