Archive for: Natural Disasters


This 2009 flagship report argues that reproductive health care, including family planning, and gender relations could influence the future course of climate change and affect how humanity adapts to rising seas, worsening storms and severe droughts. Women, especially impoverished women in developing countries, bear the disproportionate burden of climate change, but are often largely overlooked in the debate about how to address problems of rising seas, droughts, melting glaciers and extreme weather. The report cites research demonstrating women’s higher vulnerability in natural disasters—especially where incomes are low and status differences between men and women are high. The international community’s fight against climate change is more likely to be successful if policies, programmes and treaties take into account the needs, rights and potential of women. The report shows that investments that empower women and girls—particularly education and health—bolster economic development, reduce poverty, and have a beneficial impact on climate change.

Year: 2009

Source: United Nations Population Fund

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This paper synthesizes four case studies from Uganda, Myanmar, Sudan/Chad, and Burkina Faso, documenting strategies towards building gender equality through resilience projects. The purpose is to document how gender inequalities manifest themselves in all four locations; how gender is conceptualised in theories of change (ToCs); the operationalisation of objectives to tackle gender inequalities; internal and external obstacles to the implementation of gender-sensitive activities; and drivers that help NGOs transform gender relations and build resilience. The case studies describe how disasters and climate change affect gender groups and underscore the patriarchal social norms that disproportionately restrict women and girls’ equal access to rights and resources. This paper aims to demonstrate how to draw on promising practices to make resilience projects inclusive and equitable. It also recommends areas where further research could increase understanding of resilience to climate extremes and longer-term changes, and suggests how donors and funding can best support efforts to build communities’ resilience.

Year: 2016

Source: The BRACED Project

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Large-scale anthropogenic changes to the natural environment, including land-use change, climate change, and the deterioration of ecosystem services, are all accelerating. These changes are interacting to generate five major emerging public health threats that endanger the health and well-being of hundreds of millions of people. These threats include increasing exposure to infectious disease, water scarcity, food scarcity, natural disasters, and population displacement. Taken together, they may represent the greatest public health challenge humanity has faced. There is an urgent need to improve our understanding of the dynamics of each of these threats: the complex interplay of factors that generate them, the characteristics of populations that make them particularly vulnerable, and the identification of which populations are at greatest risk from each of these threats. Such improved understanding would be the basis for stepped-up efforts at modeling and mapping global vulnerability to each of these threats. It would also help natural resource managers and policy makers to estimate the health impacts associated with their decisions and would allow aid organizations to target their resources more effectively.

Year: 2009

Source: Annual Review of Environment and Resources

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