Archive for: World Wildlife Fund


The Promise of Planetary Health

This video, presented by the Planetary Health Alliance in partnership with the World Wildlife Fund and the Harvard University Center for the Environment, highlights how the disruption of nature is threatening planetary health and wellbeing, while underlining the need for solutions such as increased access to education, women’s empowerment, and reproductive health care for a sustainable future.

Year: 2021

Source: Planetary Health Alliance

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Scaling up Population and Environment Approaches in Madagascar: A Case Study

Much has been written on the history of and factors affecting environment sector successes and challenges in Madagascar. This case study focuses specifically on how the conservation sector has engaged in identifying and addressing unmet need for family planning (FP) in Madagascar over approximately two decades (1988 –2007), in the context of improving local livelihoods and reducing pressures on the country’s dwindling natural resource base including its unique biodiversity. It looks at how previous andongoing efforts linking or integrating population and environment (PE) efforts have been and are being scaled up past the site level. The purpose of this study is to highlight drivers of change, constraints and enabling factors to help explain the history and to identify strategies that may be replicable or newly applied elsewhere in-country or outside. This case study is designed to help answer the question: How can the conservation community further contribute to meeting unmet need for family planning in order to reduce future pressure on natural resources and biodiversity and promote more sustainable livelihoods?

Year: 2008

Source: World Wildlife Fund

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    Scaling Up Integrated Population, Health and Environment Approaches in the Philippines

    From the 1980s-1990s the Philippine Government, with help from the United Nations and the academic community, created poverty alleviation projects that linked Population, Health, and Environment (PHE). These PHE projects focused on improving natural resource management, reproductive health services, enhancing food security, and providing Filipinos with more livelihood options. These integrated projects proved to be successful, creating a desire to spread or “scale-up” the PHE approach. Scaling-up has three components: expansion, replication, and collaboration. This report notes several opportunities for scaling-up, such as reaching out to new locations and people, extending pilot projects to policies at local and national levels, and expanding services to current clients. Another key factor for scaling-up the PHE approach is strengthening the national PHE network. A recap of lessons that have been learned through scaling-up is also included.

    Year: 2008

    Source: World Wildlife Fund | Population Reference Bureau

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      Population, Health and Environment in Africa and Asia: An Evaluation of WWF’s USAID and Johnson & Johnson-Supported Projects

      This report describes the results of a 2007 evaluation of WWF (World Wildlife Fund) PHE (Population, Health and Environment) projects sponsored by Johnson & Johnson and USAID (the U.S. Agency for International Development). The PHE sites were located in Africa and Asia, where human-environment interactions are in constant flux, human populations are growing rapidly, and they depend most directly on and affect most profoundly some of the richest forest and marine ecosystems on Earth. The PHE projects facilitated basic health care and RH (reproductive health) provision with the working thesis that improving human health and environmental conservation jointly adds value to each independently. The report also recommends future actions on sustainability and scale up of PHE approaches, improved data collection and monitoring and technical support.

      Year: 2008

      Source: World Wildlife Fund

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        HIV/AIDS and Environment: A Manual for Conservation Organizations on Impacts and Responses

        Produced by World Wildlife Fund and the Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group, this manual aims to raise awareness of the links between HIV/AIDS and the environment, and provide guidance to conservation organizations on actions they can take to reduce the impacts on their organizations, the local communities they partner with, and the environment. The HIV/AIDS epidemic is having serious impacts on biodiversity conservation and natural resource management, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. In light of these impacts, this manual is designed to help conservation organizations plan and take action to protect staff, the communities in which they work, and the natural resources and biodiversity they aim to conserve. Suggested interventions include workplace actions, training strategies, community actions and scaling up responses among the broader conservation community.

        Year: 2013

        Source: World Wildlife Fund | Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group

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          Engendering Conservation Constituencies: Understanding the Links between Women’s Empowerment and Biodiversity Conservation Outcomes for PHE Programs – WWF-Nepal Case Study

          This WWF-Nepal case study explores the impact of the PHE component of the WWF-Nepal Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) Project on women’s empowerment. The key research questions focus on 1) how PHE activities contribute to women’s empowerment and (2) how empowered women contribute to conservation outcomes. This case study piloted the WWF Women’s Economic, Social and Political Empowerment (WWESPE) Tool. The aim is to help conservation and/or other PHE project staff understand how their PHE (or conservation-only) projects contribute to women’s empowerment and the conservation outcomes and learn how to enhance these women’s empowerment impacts. The case study found that the TAL and TAL-PHE approach helped to advance women’s empowerment and their involvement in conservation in project communities. The report found that the extent and pattern of women’s economic, social and political empowerment varied within project communities, but the use of adult and youth peer educators and inclusion of a gender module in the peer educator trainings successfully contributed to women’s empowerment.

          Year: 2010

          Source: World Wildlife Fund

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            Learning Brief Number 3: Goodwill Generation for Conservation Through the Population-Health-Environment Approach

            The Population-Health-Environment (PHE) Alliance Project, implemented by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) from 2008 to 2011, with support from the United States Agency for International Development’s Office of Population and Reproductive Health and Johnson & Johnson, aimed to change that practice, and by doing so, deepen the sector’s understanding of the value of the PHE approach for conservation, and how the sector could better measure that value. The following learning brief explores the role of goodwill generation in-site based conservation through the PHE approach, using a case study from one PHE Alliance project site- in Nepal. The brief concludes that generating goodwill for conservation is a viable justification for implementing PHE projects to improve conservation outcomes. The case study highlights positive outcomes relating to the generation of goodwill for conservation, in a place where communities have historically been somewhat suspicious about WWF’s conservation agenda. The case study findings suggest that in the future, with more research, the PHE approach might emerge as a useful strategy for transforming community attitudes and behaviors towards conservation that are critical to ensuring long term conservation success.

            Year: 2011

            Source: World Wildlife Fund

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              Learning Brief Number 2: Women’s Empowerment for Conservation Through the Population-Health-Environment Approach

              The Population-Health-Environment (PHE) Alliance Project, implemented by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) from 2008 to 2011, with support from the United States Agency for International Development’s Office of Population and Reproductive Health and Johnson & Johnson, aimed to change that practice, and by doing so, deepen the sector’s understanding of the value of the PHE approach for conservation, and how the sector could better measure that value. The following learning brief explores the role of women’s empowerment in site-based conservation through the PHE approach, using case studies from two PHE Alliance project sites – in Nepal and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The brief concludes that women’s empowerment is a viable justification for implementing PHE projects to improve conservation outcomes, as well as an end in itself. The case studies highlight positive women’s empowerment outcomes and suggest that in the future, the PHE approach might emerge as a powerful strategy for ensuring: women’s meaningful involvement in conservation, women’s ability to derive tangible benefits from conservation, and more sustainable conservation successes.

              Year: 2011

              Source: World Wildlife Fund

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                Learning Brief Number 1: Conservation and Family Planning: What Is the Value of Integrating Family Planning Into Conservation Projects?

                Conservation organizations have integrated family planning into site-based conservation activities in selected countries for almost two decades yet lacked strong evidence of the approach’s value to conservation. The aim of this analysis was to identify evidence of linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes in conservation field projects. The analysis examined a portfolio of eight projects across six countries that had: primary end goals of conservation, been involved for at least three years in bringing family planning to local communities, and substantial amounts of monitoring and evaluation. WWF staff conducted semi-structured interviews with field project managers about linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes. WWF staff then solicited existing data from projects and synthesized evidence. Results indicate strong evidence for the earliest stages of several common assumption patterns, particularly in support of the assumption that family planning interventions implemented by conservation organizations lead to an increase in family planning use in the remote areas where these projects are implemented. Other linkages remained more tenuous.

                Abridged version of this resource.

                Year: 2011

                Source: World Wildlife Fund

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                  Conservation and Family Planning: What Is the Value of Integrating Family Planning Into Conservation Projects?

                  Conservation organizations have integrated family planning into site-based conservation activities in selected countries for almost two decades yet lacked strong evidence of the approach’s value to conservation. The aim of this analysis was to identify evidence of linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes in conservation field projects. The analysis examined a portfolio of eight projects across six countries that had: primary end goals of conservation, been involved for at least three years in bringing family planning to local communities, and substantial amounts of monitoring and evaluation. WWF staff conducted semistructured interviews with field project managers about linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes. WWF staff then solicited existing data from projects and synthesized evidence. Results indicate strong evidence for the earliest stages of several common assumption patterns, particularly in support of the assumption that family planning interventions implemented by conservation organizations lead to an increase in family planning use in the remote areas where these projects are implemented. Other linkages remained more tenuous.

                  Year: 2012

                  Source: Population Association of America

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