Archive for: Conservation International


The third National Conference on Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) was held in March 2008 Tagatay City, Philippines. The 350 delegates focused on the expansion, strengthening, and advancement of integrated Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) approaches. International partners from a myriad of countries shared PHE methods, models, and networks. Skill building sessions, presentations, demonstrations, and discussions were held to expand PHE knowledge and strengthen partnerships.

Year: 2008

Source: Conservation International

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This paper builds the evidence base for how implementers have integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and freshwater ecosystem conservation to date in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and documents lessons learned from projects that take a more holistic approach to conservation and development. After an extensive review of existing projects that integrate freshwater conservation and WASH appraoches, the report summarizes four projects that provide good models for future efforts in SSA. These projects are: The Rural Access to New Opportunities for Health and Water Resource Management (RANON’ALA) Project in Madagascar; Pangani Basin Environmental Flow Assessment in Tanzania; Working for Wetlands in South Africa; and the Sustainable Fisheries (Ba-Nafaa) Project in The Gambia and Senegal. The report also provides lessons learned from the review, as well as an analysis of opportunities and challenges with implementing integrated health and conservation projects.

Year: 2012

Source: Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group | Conservation International

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This document reviews Conservation International’s PHE projects in some of the most remote, biologically diverse areas of the world, including the Cardamom Mountains Conservation Landscape (CCL) in southwestern Cambodia, the Zahamena-Mantadia Biological Corridor in eastern Madagascar, and the Sierra Madre Biodiversity Corridor (SMBC) in northern Philippines. CI’s PHE projects achieved results in both health and conservation – such as providing health services; training local health care professionals in health and conservation; promoting behavior change and educating youth about the importance of conservation; and building the capacity to pursue alternative livelihoods through improved forest management. This document demonstrates how CI, and global partners, have worked to improve the lives of remote, vulnerable populations in some of the most biodiversity-rich environments by improving human wellbeing while also conserving vital biodiversity.

Year: 2008

Source: Conservation International

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From a range of interviews, observations, and desk reviews of documents this publication presents lessons learned from Conservation International (CI) and Cooperative for Assistance Relief Everywhere (CARE)’s health care and conservation initiative in the Cardamom Mountains Region of Cambodia. The primary focus is on elements of CI’s Population Health Environment (PHE) interventions involving reproductive health/family planning activities and conservation in partnership with CARE-Cambodia to deliver family planning, reproductive and general health services in southwestern Cambodia.

Year: 2008

Source: Conservation International

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From April 2011 to July 2012, Conservation International (CI) Madagascar implemented a Population, Health and Environment (PHE) project called Tokantrano Salama in the Ambositra-Vondrozo Forest Corridor (COFAV) in southeastern Madagascar. With funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, CI Madagascar and partners Voahary Salama and Ny Tanintsika increased access to family planning and reproductive health (FP/RH) services, improved access to clean water sources and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) services, and promoted the benefits of integrated PHE approaches both within Madagascar and to the global PHE community. Using this integrated approach, CI and partners helped communities to improve their health at the same time they improved their water sources and the environment in this fragile and unique ecosystem.

Year: 2012

Source: Conservation International

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