Archive for: Philippines


This booklet summarizes the journey of Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) in the Philippines. Synthesizing decades of leadership and learnings from PHE programs led by local and regional experts, it highlights key projects and milestones and summarizes lessons learned and key themes that have emerged during the last two decades. This resource is intended to serve as a practical guide for others interested in PHE implementation, including program managers, technical advisors, or policymakers in the Philippines and around the world.

Year: 2021

Source: Knowledge SUCCESS and PATH Foundation Philippines, Inc.

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In February 2010, the USAID-funded BALANCED Project sponsored a South-to-South learning opportunity for government and non-governmental officials to observe how local stakeholders in the Philippines implement integrated Population, Health and Environment (PHE) approaches. PATH Foundation Philippines, Inc. (PFPI), a BALANCED Project partner, hosted ten developing country representatives from six African and Asian countries. They spent two weeks visiting PHE learning sites and a marine protected area in Bohol province. PFPI has been working for the past ten years on the Integrated Population and Coastal Resource Management Initiative (IPOPCORM) and has a wealth of lessons learned and best practices to share with people who are new to PHE. Based on these lessons learned and program design discussions, the participants developed action plans for their respective organizations and countries, in order to implement PHE at home.

Year: 2010

Source: The BALANCED Project

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From the 1980s-1990s the Philippine Government, with help from the United Nations and the academic community, created poverty alleviation projects that linked Population, Health, and Environment (PHE). These PHE projects focused on improving natural resource management, reproductive health services, enhancing food security, and providing Filipinos with more livelihood options. These integrated projects proved to be successful, creating a desire to spread or “scale-up” the PHE approach. Scaling-up has three components: expansion, replication, and collaboration. This report notes several opportunities for scaling-up, such as reaching out to new locations and people, extending pilot projects to policies at local and national levels, and expanding services to current clients. Another key factor for scaling-up the PHE approach is strengthening the national PHE network. A recap of lessons that have been learned through scaling-up is also included.

Year: 2008

Source: World Wildlife Fund | Population Reference Bureau

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The Packard Foundation’s Population-Environment (PE) Initiative, which began in June 2000, placed primary emphasis on supporting projects that integrated conservation and family planning in communities near areas of high biodiversity. It supported leadership development and increased advocacy for and awareness of population-environment linkages. The PE strategy sought to improve the quality of life in focal areas, increase collaboration and leadership on interdisciplinary topics, and used mass media and targeted campaigns to increase the public and policymakers’ awareness of the links and solutions. The review team finalized a report to the Packard Foundation in June, 2005 that covers the three objectives of the Packard Foundation Population-Initiative. This report to USAID provides a more limited assessment of the success of the Packard and USAID-funded field projects with a particular focus on six USAID-funded projects in the Philippines and Madagascar, three of which are co-funded with Packard.
This 2005 project review concentrates on three major questions:
  1. What are the likely long-term impacts of this Initiative on funding and the field of Population-Environment?
  2. What results have been achieved by projects implemented under the Initiative? and
  3. What lessons have been learned that may be of broader use to the Foundation, other donors, and the field as a result of implementing this Initiative?

Year: 2005

Source: United States Agency for International Development | The David and Lucille Packard Foundation

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This brief summarizes a study conducted in the Philippines by Pollnac and Dacanay in 2011, which assessed the benefits of the Integrated Population and Coastal Resource Management (IPOPCORM) project, an integrated population and environment (PE) project implemented by PATH Foundation Philippines Inc.(PFPI) in the Visayan region of the Philippines. In light of the growing interest in evidence to support the position that integrated projects create synergies and add value, the “Building Actors and Leaders for Advancing Community Excellence in Development” (BALANCED) Project conducted research that tested this hypothesis. The study investigated what factors contributed most towards attaining benefits from an integrated PE approach. The authors found that the level of participation was a key determinant of benefits. Other significant factors in determining the degree of benefits included type of nongovernmental organization activities, context factors inherent to a community (e.g., population size and density), and individual characteristics of those who participated in the project.

Year: 2011

Source: The BALANCED Project

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This report describes the results of a 2007 evaluation of WWF (World Wildlife Fund) PHE (Population, Health and Environment) projects sponsored by Johnson & Johnson and USAID (the U.S. Agency for International Development). The PHE sites were located in Africa and Asia, where human-environment interactions are in constant flux, human populations are growing rapidly, and they depend most directly on and affect most profoundly some of the richest forest and marine ecosystems on Earth. The PHE projects facilitated basic health care and RH (reproductive health) provision with the working thesis that improving human health and environmental conservation jointly adds value to each independently. The report also recommends future actions on sustainability and scale up of PHE approaches, improved data collection and monitoring and technical support.

Year: 2008

Source: World Wildlife Fund

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This peer-reviewed journal article on the value added of PHE approaches describes a quasi-experimental design used by the IPOPCORM project in the Philippines to test the hypothesis that there will be a significant improvement in both coastal resource management (CRM) and human reproductive health (RH) outcomes by delivering these services in an integrated manner as opposed to delivering either in isolation. The CRM, RH and integrated CRM+RH interventions were tested in three island municipalities of Palawan. Pre-project (2001) and post-project (2007) measurements of dependent variables were gathered via biophysical and community household surveys. The results support the project’s central hypothesis that integrated coastal resource management and family planning delivered simultaneously and with community involvement generate greater impact than stand alone interventions.

Year: 2010

Source: Environmental Conservation

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This document reviews Conservation International’s PHE projects in some of the most remote, biologically diverse areas of the world, including the Cardamom Mountains Conservation Landscape (CCL) in southwestern Cambodia, the Zahamena-Mantadia Biological Corridor in eastern Madagascar, and the Sierra Madre Biodiversity Corridor (SMBC) in northern Philippines. CI’s PHE projects achieved results in both health and conservation – such as providing health services; training local health care professionals in health and conservation; promoting behavior change and educating youth about the importance of conservation; and building the capacity to pursue alternative livelihoods through improved forest management. This document demonstrates how CI, and global partners, have worked to improve the lives of remote, vulnerable populations in some of the most biodiversity-rich environments by improving human wellbeing while also conserving vital biodiversity.

Year: 2008

Source: Conservation International

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This issue of Outlook examines the relationships between family planning and the environment, including key lessons learned from integrated or linked family planning and conservation interventions. The author targets family planning practitioners who are seeking new ways of reframing a fundamental issue – how family planning and the environment relate within the context of well-being and promoting social equity. Case studies from projects in the Philippines and Uganda demonstrate the possibilities and challenges of operationally linking family planning and environmental interventions on the ground.

Year: 2010

Source: PATH | Outlook

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This case study demonstrates how an NGO microfinance institution went from being skeptical to optimistic about innovative approaches to social development in the Philippines. With the prevalence of poverty on the rise in the Philippines, from 37% of the population to 50% in three years, the FCB Foundation, Inc. (FCBFI) was founded as the first microfinance institution in the province of Bohol, as a branch of the First Consolidated Bank. The FCBFI’s mission is to address the social development needs of the population through microcredit programs, aiming to create jobs and expand entrepreneurial activities. But questioning arose that FCBFI had been spreading itself thin across too many development sectors. Integrated population, health, and environment (PHE) approaches were introduced to FCBFI with PATH Foundation Philippines, Inc. (PFPI)’s project, Integrated Population and Coastal Resource Management (IPOPCORM). This gave birth to a partnership between the two organizations.

Year: 2006

Source: Population Reference Bureau

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