Archive for: Mexico


Review of Population-Health-Environment Programs Supported by the Packard Foundation and USAID

The Packard Foundation’s Population-Environment (PE) Initiative, which began in June 2000, placed primary emphasis on supporting projects that integrated conservation and family planning in communities near areas of high biodiversity. It supported leadership development and increased advocacy for and awareness of population-environment linkages. The PE strategy sought to improve the quality of life in focal areas, increase collaboration and leadership on interdisciplinary topics, and used mass media and targeted campaigns to increase the public and policymakers’ awareness of the links and solutions. The review team finalized a report to the Packard Foundation in June, 2005 that covers the three objectives of the Packard Foundation Population-Initiative. This report to USAID provides a more limited assessment of the success of the Packard and USAID-funded field projects with a particular focus on six USAID-funded projects in the Philippines and Madagascar, three of which are co-funded with Packard.
This 2005 project review concentrates on three major questions:
  1. What are the likely long-term impacts of this Initiative on funding and the field of Population-Environment?
  2. What results have been achieved by projects implemented under the Initiative? and
  3. What lessons have been learned that may be of broader use to the Foundation, other donors, and the field as a result of implementing this Initiative?

Year: 2005

Source: United States Agency for International Development | The David and Lucille Packard Foundation

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    Resource Management and Fertility in Mexico’s Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve: Campos, Cash, and Contraception in the Lobster Fishing Village of Punta Allen

    This case study examines the link between marine resource management and the contraceptive use among married couples in the lobster-fishing village of Punta Allen, located in the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Several reasons appear to contribute to small desired and actual family sizes, including a medical clinic staff effective in promoting family planning, cooperative and private resource ownership, changing cultural attitudes, geographical limitations to population and economic growth, and a desire to conserve the environment for aesthetic and economic motives.

    Year: 2008

    Source: Population and Environment

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      Learning Brief Number 1: Conservation and Family Planning: What Is the Value of Integrating Family Planning Into Conservation Projects?

      Conservation organizations have integrated family planning into site-based conservation activities in selected countries for almost two decades yet lacked strong evidence of the approach’s value to conservation. The aim of this analysis was to identify evidence of linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes in conservation field projects. The analysis examined a portfolio of eight projects across six countries that had: primary end goals of conservation, been involved for at least three years in bringing family planning to local communities, and substantial amounts of monitoring and evaluation. WWF staff conducted semi-structured interviews with field project managers about linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes. WWF staff then solicited existing data from projects and synthesized evidence. Results indicate strong evidence for the earliest stages of several common assumption patterns, particularly in support of the assumption that family planning interventions implemented by conservation organizations lead to an increase in family planning use in the remote areas where these projects are implemented. Other linkages remained more tenuous.

      Abridged version of this resource.

      Year: 2011

      Source: World Wildlife Fund

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        Conservation and Family Planning: What Is the Value of Integrating Family Planning Into Conservation Projects?

        Conservation organizations have integrated family planning into site-based conservation activities in selected countries for almost two decades yet lacked strong evidence of the approach’s value to conservation. The aim of this analysis was to identify evidence of linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes in conservation field projects. The analysis examined a portfolio of eight projects across six countries that had: primary end goals of conservation, been involved for at least three years in bringing family planning to local communities, and substantial amounts of monitoring and evaluation. WWF staff conducted semistructured interviews with field project managers about linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes. WWF staff then solicited existing data from projects and synthesized evidence. Results indicate strong evidence for the earliest stages of several common assumption patterns, particularly in support of the assumption that family planning interventions implemented by conservation organizations lead to an increase in family planning use in the remote areas where these projects are implemented. Other linkages remained more tenuous.

        Year: 2012

        Source: Population Association of America

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