Archive for: Global


Women’s Role in Adapting to Climate Change and Variability

Women are engaged in more climate-related change activities than is often recognized. This article highlights women’s important role in the adaptation of and search for safer communities, which leads them to understand better the causes and consequences of changes in climatic conditions. It is concluded that women have important knowledge and skills for orienting the adaptation processes, a product of their roles in society (productive, reproductive and community). In addition, the importance of gender equity in these processes is recognized. The relationship among climate change, climate variability and the accomplishment of the Millennium Development Goals is also considered.

Year: 2008

Source: Advances in GeoSciences

Access the resource

    Women’s Organizations and Climate Finance: Engaging in Processes and Accessing Resources

    Climate finance should flow to women’s organizations, gender-related groups, and feminist organizations working at the intersection of gender equality and climate change. Efforts toward enhanced gender-responsiveness of climate finance must include the groups, organizations, and networks best positioned to realize gender equality on the ground, contributing to more robust climate solutions and outcomes. These truths are undeniable, but we know that practice has not yet caught up to the ideal. In response, Prospera, the International Network of Women’s Funds, and WEDO have been working to identify the best engagement pathways for organizations to ensure the four primary public climate funds begin to make this a reality. This report is one piece of the ongoing work and advocacy undertaken by many colleagues and collaborators, to transform our climate finance system into one that is gender-responsive and equitable.

    Year: 2019

    Source: Women’s Environment and Development Organization | Prospera

    Access the resource

    Additional Resources

      Women as Environmental Stewards: The Experience of the Small Grants Programme

      The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is one of the major international climate funds, they’ve increasingly been incorporating a stronger gender perspective (to be more “gender responsive”) in their work. Their Small Grants Programme (SGP) launched this paper at the GEF Dialogue with Civil Society meeting . The paper attempts to “document good practices featuring women as environmental stewards and focuses exclusively on projects led and implemented by women.”

      Year: 2018

      Source: Global Environment Facility Partners

      Access the resource

        Why Population Matters

        This report focuses on how population impacts many aspects of our lives, including issues as diverse as poverty, health, education, water, and forests. Population matters even more today because historically high numbers of people are intensifying these impacts on our well-being at a time when the demographic picture of the world is becoming increasingly complex. The report includes a glossary of population terms and explains how and why population matters to a variety of issues, including Maternal Health, Infectious Diseases and HIV/AIDS, Education and Labor, Poverty Reduction, Migration and Urbanization, Security, Food Security, Climate Change, Water Resources, Forests, and Biodiversity.

        Year: 2011

        Source: PAI

        Access the resource

          How Can Population, Health, and Environment Projects Learn From Family Planning High Impact Practices?

          Family Planning High Impact Practices (HIPs) are a set of evidence-based practices developed by experts in the family planning sector that improve family planning and reproductive health outcomes. This webinar, hosted by the PACE (Policy, Advocacy, and Communication Enhanced for Population and Reproductive Health) project and the Implementing Best Practices Initiative Secretariat, explores how HIPs can be applied in development programs that integrate multiple sectors at the community level, including family planning.

          Year: 2019

          Source: Population Reference Bureau

          Access the resource

            Vulnerability and Resilience in the Face of Climate Change: Current Research and Needs for Population Information

            Research on vulnerability and resilience is rooted in the common-sense observation that similar climate events can produce very different levels of socioeconomic impact, depending not only on the location and timing of occurrence, but also the resources and agility of the societies who experience climate change impacts. The degree of impact depends on the ways in which the natural triggering event interacts with particular ecosystems and with the specific characteristics of the society affected, including its level of economic development; the types of livelihoods of its members; education levels; and other factors that generally determine both how resilient the affected population is as well as what resources are available for adaptation. This paper addresses four related topics: (1) varying definitions of vulnerability and resilience (and, to a lesser extent, adaptive capacity) and the implications of those differences for societal analysis, (2) candidate approaches to characterizing societal resilience to climate change, (3) methods for assessing resilience, and (4) the potential contribution of a richer understanding of affected populations to the study of resilience.

            Year: 2009

            Source: PAI | Battelle

            Access the resource

              Voluntary Family Planning to Minimise and Mitigate Climate Change

              Simply put, climate change is caused by excessive production of green-house gases. As highlighted by the late Professor Tony McMichael, the “cause(s) of the causes” should not be overlooked. With climate change already close to an irreversible tipping point, urgent action is needed to reduce not only our mean (carbon) footprints but also the “number of feet”—that is, the growing population either already creating large footprints or aspiring to do so. Wise and compassionate promotion of contraceptive care and education in a rights based, culturally appropriate framework offers a cost effective strategy to reduce greenhouse gases. This article outlines the evidence for voluntary accessible family planning as a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change.

              Year: 2016

              Source: British Medical Journal

              Access the resource

                Thriving Together Campaign

                A hugely diverse alliance of over 150 organisations working in 170 countries support the Thriving Together statement. Whether their work has a focus on conserving endangered species, providing family planning services, restoring habitats, promoting sexual and reproductive health and rights or a range of other human and environmental health issues, they all agree with the Thriving Together statement. At the heart of the statement is the widespread agreement, for the first time, that removal of barriers to family planning is critically important not only for women and girls, but also for environmental conservation and biodiversity. The Trust’s paper “Removing Barriers to Family Planning, Empowering Sustainable Environmental Conservation: A Background Paper and Call for Action” summarises why removing barriers to family planning is critical for women’s and girls’ health and empowerment, and sustainable environmental conservation.

                Source: Margaret Pyke Trust

                Access the resource

                  Progress on Household Drinking Water, Sanitation and Hygiene 2000–2017. Special Focus on Inequalities

                  The World Health Organization and United Nations Children’s Fund (WHO/UNICEF) Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (JMP) produces internationally comparable estimates of progress on drinking water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and is responsible for global monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets related to WASH. This report presents updated national, regional and global estimates for WASH in households for the period 2000-2017. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development commits UN member states to take bold and transformative steps to ‘shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path’, ‘realize the human rights of all’, ‘end poverty in all its forms’, and ensure ‘no one will be left behind’. The UN General Assembly will conduct its first quadrennial review of progress in September 2019. This report assesses progress in reducing inequalities in household WASH services and identifies the populations most at risk of being ‘left behind’.

                  Year: 2019

                  Source: WHO | UNICEF

                  Access the resource

                    The Interaction of Human Population, Food Production, and Biodiversity Protection

                    Research suggests that the scale of human population and the current pace of its growth contribute substantially to the loss of biological diversity. Although technological change and unequal consumption inextricably mingle with demographic impacts on the environment, the needs of all human beings—especially for food—imply that projected population growth will undermine protection of the natural world. Numerous solutions have been proposed to boost food production while protecting biodiversity, but alone these proposals are unlikely to staunch biodiversity loss. An important approach to sustaining biodiversity and human well-being is through actions that can slow and eventually reverse population growth: investing in universal access to reproductive health services and contraceptive technologies, advancing women’s education, and achieving gender equality.

                    Year: 2017

                    Source: Science

                    Access the resource