Archive for: Brief


A successful population, health, and environment (PHE) project requires the full and equal participation of women and girls and men and boys. In order to address the urgent, interconnected challenges in the Lake Victoria Basin—poor maternal and child health, a lack of access to contraception, dwindling fish supply, deforestation, and more—interventions must also work towards gender equality. Women must be able to exercise their right to sexual and reproductive health care services, including their ability to choose if or when to have children. They must be able to participate in income-generating activities, which improve their economic situation and better equip them to protect their families and the natural resources they depend on. The Health of People and the Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project works to promote gender equality. HoPE-LVB implements a range of activities, including training women’s and young mother’s groups on integrated health and conservation practices and conducting community dialogue sessions surrounding the intersection between gender, sexual and reproductive health, and the environment to bridge gender divides and encourage input and support from all community members.

Year: 2014

Source: Pathfinder International

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    The overall goal of the The Health of People and the Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) Project is to reduce threats to biodiversity conservation and ecosystem degradation in the lake basin, while simultaneously increasing access to family planning and sexual and reproductive health to improve maternal and child health in project communities. This brief describes how the energy-efficient stove campaign exemplifies the power of this integration and the HoPE-LVB project.

    Year: 2016

    Source: Pathfinder International

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      The Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project seeks to reduce threats to biodiversity conservation and ecosystem degradation in the LVB while simultaneously increasing access to family planning and reproductive health services, in order to improve maternal and child health in Kenya and Uganda. This brief discusses how HoPE-LVB builds the capacity of Beach Management Units (BMUs) to take collective responsibility to actively protect and restore fish stocks, their habitat, and the entire ecosystem they depend on. This goes hand-in-hand with harvest management— establishing who, when, and where to fish, as well as tracking and documenting the fish catches.

      Year: 2016

      Source: Pathfinder International

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        This brief discusses the importance of advocacy at multiple scales to build policymaker support for the Health of People and the Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project. Staff and partners have engaged key district, national, and regional health and environment officials in Kenya and Uganda. The project goals are to: (1) increase stakeholders’ understanding of the interconnectedness of PHE issues and the benefits of the PHE approach; (2) increase the key stakeholders’ capacity to communicate about the PHE approach; and (3) provide platforms for policy dialogue to influence regional and national stakeholders to integrate PHE into their programs.

        Year: 2016

        Source: Pathfinder International

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          This policy brief explores the complex relationship between population dynamics and economic development in developing countries. When populations transition from high mortality and fertility rates to longer life expectancies and smaller family sizes, this is known as the demographic dividend. The brief expains how, during this transition phase, there are potentially significant economic benefits. In addition, the authors make recommendations for policy changes to increase investments in family planning and reproductive health, girls’ education, and economic development for youth.

          Year: 2011

          Source: The Aspen Institute

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            There is a need to understand how best to integrate family planning with food security and nutrition programming and a need to raise awareness about the importance of family planning for improved food security and nutrition outcomes. However, to date there has been limited peer reviewed literature and a dearth of documentation on programmatic experiences of integrating family planning with food security and nutrition. To address this evidence gap, the Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance III Project (FANTA) conducted a desk review to take stock of and better understand how food security and nutrition programs are integrating family planning. As a companion to this review, the Health Policy Project conducted two literature reviews summarizing the empirical evidence on why it is important to integrate these services. This brief summarizes the findings from the FANTA desk review.

            Year: 2015

            Source: FHI 360 | FANTA Project

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              The USAID Multi-Sectoral Nutrition Strategy 2014­–2025 prioritizes family planning and reproductive health services (FP/RH) as nutrition-sensitive interventions that address the underlying and systemic causes of malnutrition. However, there is limited peer reviewed literature and a dearth of documentation on how to best integrate FP with food security and nutrition programming. To address this gap, FANTA conducted an extensive desk review to identify and synthesize programmatic experiences, including integration models, platforms, contact points, and providers used for integrated service delivery. This report synthesizes learnings from 102 health and multisectoral programs, including a rich set of program examples and three case studies, to illustrate the ways programs integrate family planning with nutrition and food security interventions. A third of the multisectoral programs included in the review and one cast study were PHE programs. The report and brief also include lessons learned, promising practices for programming, and recommendations for USAID.

              Year: 2015

              Source: FHI 360

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                Many areas that lack safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) also need to restore or protect fresh water ecosystems and enhance resilience to climate change. Integrated solutions can help end extreme poverty and ensure long-term access to basic human needs such as food, clean water, and sanitation facilities. Currently, the development sector all too often addresses WASH, climate resilience, and fresh water conservation as separate issues. Fortunately, though, awareness about the importance of integrated efforts to solve these challenges in development projects is increasing. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has publicly spoken about and financially supported some efforts to promote integrated solutions for addressing WASH, conservation, and climate. However, more can and should be done to fully facilitate integrated approaches.This Natural Resources Defense Council issue brief is focused on examples from U.S. government development aid funding, however, its recommendations are relevant for any funder or implementer, including development agencies, foundations, or nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).

                Year: 2014

                Source: Natural Resources Defense Council

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                  Both the family planning sector and the environmental sector will be interested in this synopsis of findings from a study of the first four years of the Tuungane integrated population, health and environment (PHE) project in Tanzania. Analyses of the 2011 baseline and 2016 midline quantitative data, and additional qualitative data from 2016, measured the project’s progress and shed light on the contribution of the project interventions to building resilience, and on the links between family planning and other components of resilience. This synopsis focuses on several key indicators of resilience that relate to population, family planning, and reproductive health.

                  Year: 2018

                  Source: The Evidence Project

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                    Slowing the rapid growth of human population through strengthened voluntary family planning services would powerfully and inexpensively contribute to improvements in food security and the reduction of the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change. A confluence of long-term environmental and population trends is undermining world food availability and driving climate change. These trends include quickening climate changes and difficulty adapting to its effects; widespread depletion of water, soils and fisheries; increased diversion of grains from human consumption to bio-fuel production and livestock and poultry feed; rapid population growth, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia; and increasing affluence in middle income countries.

                    Year: 2015

                    Source: Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health

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