Archive for: Brief


Many environmental problems will be easier to address if world population peaks at 8 billion rather than continuing to grow to 11 billion or higher. The good news: there is already a global consensus on how to slow population growth, with programs that improve human well-being at very little cost.

Year: 2011

Source: PAI

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    In Sub-Saharan Africa, more than 240 million people lack adequate food for a healthy, active lifestyle. This policy brief examines trends in population growth, fertility, and family planning in sub-Saharan Africa and makes the case that investments in women and family planning are necessary to fulfill future food needs. Food security and nutrition advocates must add their voices to support investments in women and girls and voluntary family planning as essential complements to agriculture and food policy solutions.

    Year: 2012

    Source: Population Reference Bureau

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      For over a decade community-based projects linking family planning, health, and environment efforts were active in Fianarantsoa province, Madagascar. This brief explores the evolution of cross-sectoral approaches and projects in Fianarantsoa province. The early cross-sectoral initiatives recognized that conservation and management of natural resources could be undermined by high fertility rates, and that addressing health needs would lead to a connection between communities and development practitioners. Evaluations have demonstrated that these projects have reached new audiences, were efficient, and fostered greater community involvement.

      Year: 2006

      Source: Population Reference Bureau

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        Population Reference Bureau (PRB) coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment integration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, including identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. An assessment of this “state of integration” was undertaken by an interdisciplinary team led by Pro-Biodiversity Conservationists in Kampala, Uganda, to explore in more detail population-health-environment (PHE) interactions and the opportunities for and challenges of cross-sectoral collaboration and integrated programming in Uganda. This policy brief is based on the Uganda PHE Assessment written by Elady Muyambi of Pro-Biodiversity Conservationists in Uganda, with assistance from members of the Uganda PHE Assessment team. The methods used for this assessment include a review of relevant policies, laws, and project docu-ments; key information interviews; and field visits to case study sites. The Uganda PHE Assessment was made possible with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

        Year: 2009

        Source: Population Reference Bureau

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          The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Rwanda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. Drawing lessons from countries where PHE programs have already been successfully implemented, this brief explores the PHE context, challenges, and opportunities for pursuing an integrated approach to development in Rwanda. The methods used to conduct the assessment in Rwanda included a review of relevant government policies and project documents, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions. Recommendations on the way forward include: carry out an analysis of institutional interest in and capacity for PHE integration; develop a framework for institutional coordination and policy dialogue; develop a multimedia communication strategy; and explore the urban dimension of PHE interactions.

          Year: 2009

          Source: Population Reference Bureau

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            The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Rwanda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. The methods used for this assessment include a review of relevant policies, laws, and project documents; key informant interviews; and field visits to case study sites. The Tanzania PHE Assessment was made possible with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This policy brief is based on the Tanzania PHE Assessment written in 2007 by the late Dr. N.F. Madulu, formerly of the Institute of Resource Assessment (IRA)/University of Dar es Salaam and the members of the Tanzania PHE Assessment team.

            Year: 2007

            Source: Population Reference Bureau

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              The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. The University of Nairobi and the National Coordinating Agency for Population and Development assessed the “state of integration” in Kenya. Findings confirm that these integrated approaches require more planning, coordination, and communication, but still can yield substantial results in the community and environment, including reduced dependence on forest resources, increased food security, cleaner drinking water, and greater access to health services. The assessment found that strong leadership was essential to the community-based PHE project; cross-sectoral interventions can be introduced at different times and at different scales; and that even low-cost interventions can improve the health and well-being of a community. Kenya still lacks clear legal framework and institutional money to initiate PHE policies, but according to this assessment, most development professionals prefer the integrated approach at the community level.

              Year: 2007

              Source: Population Reference Bureau

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                The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Rwanda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. Drawing lessons from countries where PHE programs have already been successfully implemented, this brief explores the PHE context, challenges, and opportunities for pursuing an integrated approach to development in Ethiopia, including identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. The paper highlights and explains several opportunities and entry points for pursuing a more holistic way to address the complex interactions between humans, their health, and the environment in Ethiopia.

                Year: 2007

                Source: Population Reference Bureau

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                  This brief describes the reasoning behind population, health, and environment (PHE) projects, which aim to simultaneously improve access to health services and manage natural resources in ways that improve livelihoods and conserve critical ecosystems. These projects have demonstrated that implementing a comprehensive and integrated strategy which builds upon existing synergies between health, family planning, and the environment is more efficient than implementing separate programs to address each of these needs. The brief also discusses the history of US engagement in supporting PHE initiatives during the past 10 years and offers several policy recommendations to expand support to non-health sectors, strengthen the evidence base and reach new audiences, and scale-up PHE programs.

                  Year: 2014

                  Source: PAI

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                    Model households are a key aspect of Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB), an integrated Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) project with sites in Kenya and Uganda. Model households are trained in multiple project activities to illustrate behaviors that allow families to thrive without taking a toll on their environment and natural resources. Model households exhibit positive behaviors, including practicing sustainable agriculture and resource planning, adopting alternative livelihoods, prioritizing reproductive health and family planning, and investing in clean water for drinking, cooking, and washing.

                    Year: 2016

                    Source: Pathfinder International

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