Archive for: Kenya


This is a report of the baseline data for the Health of People and Environment-LVB (HoPE-LVB) Project, led by Pathfinder International. The Project aims to provide underserved families and communities with knowledge and skills to improve reproductive health, reduce levels of poverty through livelihoods, and sustainably manage local natural resources. The survey found that community knowledge levels were high but practice levels were low for sectoral outcomes. Engagement in community groups was high, suggesting opportunities to implement value-added population, health, and environment (PHE) activities. The policy review found that policies encourage PHE integration, but lack structures to facilitate implementation across sectors. The participatory rural assessment yielded information on the potential ‘value-added’ that HoPE-LVB can generate, identifying increased income and access to quality health services as key priorities for the project and noting key challenges to uptake of positive health and conservation practices.

Year: 2013

Source: Pathfinder International

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    Population Health and Environment (PHE) strategies are argued to improve ecosystem and human health by addressing family size and its effects on natural resource use, food security, and reproductive health. This study investigates men’s views on a PHE family planning (FP) programme delivered among the pastoral Samburu tribe in rural northern Kenya. Three focus group discussions and nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 Samburu men. These discussions revealed support for environmentally-sensitised family planning promotion. Men highlighted their dependency on natural resources and challenges faced in providing for large families and maintaining livestock during drought. These practices were said to lead to natural resource exhaustion, environmental degradation, and wildlife dispersal, undermining key economic benefits of environmental and wildlife conservation. Relating family size to the environment is a compelling strategy to improve support for FP among Samburu men. Kenyan policy-makers should consider integrating community-based PHE strategies among underserved pastoral groups living in fragile ecosystems.

    Year: 2017

    Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

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      Family planning is a cross-cutting intervention that can accelerate progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In Kenya, family planning is a best buy that contributes to the nation’s growth and creates a path towards achieving the SDGs and Kenya’s Vision 2030. Developed in partnership with the National Council for Population and Development (NCPD) and with generous support from USAID Kenya and East Africa through the Policy, Advocacy, and Communication Enhanced for Population and Reproductive Health (PACE) Project, PRB has created a short video that demonstrates how family planning contributes to Kenya’s progress across all five SDG themes of People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace, and Partnerships. The video will be shared with policymakers throughout Kenya to enhance their understanding of the importance of family planning to realizing the SDGs.

      Year: 2017

      Source: Population Reference Bureau

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        This training resource was produced by the Green Belt Movement (GBM) and FHI 360 as part of the USAID-supported Program on Research for Strengthening Services (PROGRESS) Project in Kenya. GBM and FHI 360 developed this training manual to prepare Green Volunteers to implement activities that link population, health and the environment. The manual was revised based on feedback from pilot project trainings and research findings. The training manual can be used to guide a training that introduces Green Volunteers to PHE and to family planning, covers healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies, offers skills-building opportunities, demonstrates how to use the PHE flip-book, and reviews basic reporting requirements for the project. The training manual, which is written in English, includes participant handouts in both English and Swahili, reporting forms, and a post-training evaluation form.

        Year: 2013

        Source: Green Belt Movement | FHI 360

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          Small-scale pilot projects have demonstrated that integrated population, health and environment approaches can address the needs and rights of vulnerable communities. However, these and other types of health and development projects rarely influence larger policies and programmes. ExpandNet, a network of health professionals working on scaling up, argues this is because projects are often not designed with sustainability and scaling up in mind. This paper shows how this new approach is being applied and the initial lessons from its use in the Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin Project (HoPE-LVB) currently underway (2011-2017) in Uganda and Kenya. Specific emerging lessons are: 1) ongoing, meaningful stakeholder engagement has significantly shaped the design and implementation, 2) multi-sectoral projects are complex and striving for simplicity in the interventions is challenging, and 3) projects that address a sharply felt need experience substantial pressure for scale up, even before their effectiveness is established. This paper recommends that other projects would also benefit from applying a scale-up perspective from the outset.

          Year: 2014

          Source: Reproductive Health Matters

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            The USAID-funded Advancing Partners & Communities Project received funding for population, health, and environment (PHE) approaches in East Africa. The Nyanza Reproductive Health Society (NRHS) received an 18-month grant to pilot community PHE approaches in fragile ecosystems with at-risk populations in the Lake Victoria Basin region of Western Kenya. The NRHS team was tasked with creating a sustainable PHE model that integrates all PHE components—population (community-based family planning); health (linkages with the Kenyan health system); environment (conservation of fragile ecosystems, reforestation, beach management, etc.); and significant livelihoods components. This document details challenges, lessons learned and other takeaways regarding the sustainability of the activities.

            Year: 2016

            Source: Advancing Partners & Communities Project

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              Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) programs improve primary health care services such as family planning and reproductive health, while also helping communities conserve biodiversity, manage natural resources, and develop sustainable livelihoods. When these issues are addressed simultaneously, communities thrive. This collection highlights the experiences of PHE stakeholders and champions in the Lake Victoria Basin through stories and photos. The booklet shares a diverse set of voices from policy makers, community members, and PHE program implementers.

              Year: 2018

              Source: Lake Victoria Basin Commission | Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project

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                This ENGAGE presentation highlights many of Kenya’s development successes, including the national climate change strategy and national population policy. Breaking down complex concepts and using nontechnical language, the presentation shows the connections between people’s access to family planning and reproductive health (FP/RH) information and services, their health, and their reliance on natural resources. The presentation connects the impacts of FP/RH access for households, communities, and the country, drawing on examples of successful PHE efforts in Kenya. Stakeholders from diverse sectors within Kenya can use this resource to promote a policy dialogue about the critical role of population dynamics with health and the environment, and the ways that investments in FP/RH can propel progress towards Kenya’s many development goals.

                Available in English and Kiswahili.

                Year: 2017

                Source: Population Reference Bureau

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                  The Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project uses an integrated Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) approach with island and coastal communities in Kenya and Uganda. The project, managed by Pathfinder International and local partners, works to ensure that community members can access voluntary family planning and reproductive health services while also managing their natural resources in a way that safeguards their future. This video highlights the project and its activities – including how they aligned their program design with several of the High Impact Practices (HIPs) in Family Planning such as Community Health Workers, Community Group Engagement, and Policy. The video includes beautiful photography and footage of the Lake Victoria Basin region and has excerpts of community members describing the HIPs being used in the project.

                  Year: 2018

                  Source: Population Reference Bureau

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                    Conservation organizations have integrated family planning into site-based conservation activities in selected countries for almost two decades yet lacked strong evidence of the approach’s value to conservation. The aim of this analysis was to identify evidence of linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes in conservation field projects. The analysis examined a portfolio of eight projects across six countries that had: primary end goals of conservation, been involved for at least three years in bringing family planning to local communities, and substantial amounts of monitoring and evaluation. WWF staff conducted semi-structured interviews with field project managers about linkages between family planning interventions and conservation outcomes. WWF staff then solicited existing data from projects and synthesized evidence. Results indicate strong evidence for the earliest stages of several common assumption patterns, particularly in support of the assumption that family planning interventions implemented by conservation organizations lead to an increase in family planning use in the remote areas where these projects are implemented. Other linkages remained more tenuous.

                    Abridged version of this resource.

                    Year: 2011

                    Source: World Wildlife Fund

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