Archive for: Kenya


These stories and photos are from policy makers and champions of an integrated approach to development known as Population, Health, and Environment (PHE), which focuses on the interconnectedness between human health and environmental health. PHE programs improve primary health care services such as family planning and reproductive health, while also helping communities conserve biodiversity, manage natural resources, and develop sustainable livelihoods. When these issues are addressed  simultaneously, communities thrive. This collection highlights the experiences of PHE stakeholders and champions in the Lake Victoria Basin.

The stories are an inspiration to anyone struggling to understand why PHE is important. Any donor or development partner who is looking for reasons to invest in PHE can find answers right here. For program designers and developers of integrated PHE  approaches, this collection provides an overview of key components to consider while designing your package.

Year: 2018

Source: Lake Victoria Basin Commission and the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project

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    These maps by Population Action International shows how climate change and population dynamics will change the world over time. Country profiles of Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Nepal, and Peru are included with maps, graphs, videos, and additional resources on population, gender, and climate change trends. Interactive maps illustrate how climate change impacts, demographic trends, and the need for contraception are likely to affect countries’ abilities to adapt to climate change. The maps also identify 26 population and climate change hotspots. In many countries, a high proportion of women lack access to reproductive health services and contraceptives. Investments in family planning programs in these hotspots could improve health and well-being, slow population growth, and reduce vulnerability to climate change impacts.

    Year: 2011

    Source: PAI

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      The Population Reference Bureau coordinated a comparative study of population, health, and environment (PHE) integration and cross-sectoral collaboration in East Africa. Teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda assessed the state of PHE integration in their respective countries, through identifying relevant stakeholders; assessing the policy environment for cross-sectoral collaboration; highlighting the most salient population, health, and environment issues; and describing the current state of integration among projects, programs, and policies. The University of Nairobi and the National Coordinating Agency for Population and Development assessed the “state of integration” in Kenya. Findings confirm that these integrated approaches require more planning, coordination, and communication, but still can yield substantial results in the community and environment, including reduced dependence on forest resources, increased food security, cleaner drinking water, and greater access to health services. The assessment found that strong leadership was essential to the community-based PHE project; cross-sectoral interventions can be introduced at different times and at different scales; and that even low-cost interventions can improve the health and well-being of a community. Kenya still lacks clear legal framework and institutional money to initiate PHE policies, but according to this assessment, most development professionals prefer the integrated approach at the community level.

      Year: 2007

      Source: Population Reference Bureau

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        Although the potential advantages of linked population and environment programs are increasingly acknowledged, evidence is still limited regarding the feasibility and acceptability of PHE initiatives. In some of the best known PHE models, such as those implemented in the Philippines and Madagascar, health promotion was added to environmental initiatives through the intervention of community health workers. Less is known about the ability of environmental workers to assume a direct role in health promotion. To help fill this evidence gap, the Program Research for Strengthening Services (PROGRESS) project, which was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development to improve access to family planning services, teamed with the Green Belt Movement (GBM), a Kenyan nongovernmental organization dedicated to environmental conservation and community development. PROGRESS and GBM conducted a mixed-methods study to examine the following issues: (1) whether GBM’s frontline environmental outreach workers, known as Green Volunteers, could lead family planning promotion activities and (2) how communities would react to Green Volunteers’ promoting potentially sensitive messages about contraception. We used process monitoring and post-intervention data collection to assess the feasibility and acceptability of Green Volunteers’ implementing a PHE intervention and to explore the potential of this approach for expanding access to family planning information and services. In addition, we examined the costs of the intervention to evaluate affordability.

        Year: 2015

        Source: International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

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          Evidence confirms that family planning contributes to broad development goals of poverty reduction, enhanced education, environmental sustainability, and gender equality, but improving access to contraception has largely remained an effort contained within the health sector. While development programs outside the health sector increasingly recognize the connections between improving family planning and reaching their own goals, more evidence is needed on whether and how such efforts can work, and what types of models might be replicated and scaled up.

          The FHI 360 PROGRESS project (2008-2013) added to the evidence base on multi-sector integration, providing guidance on how development organizations can successfully expand their program model to include family planning services. Among these was the Green Belt Movement (Kenya) and Conservation Through Public Health (Uganda). Working closely with partners, PROGRESS developed, implemented, and evaluated interventions, and then synthesized lessons learned and packaged materials for use in replicating and scaling up these interventions.

          Year: 2013

          Source: FHI 360 | Progress Project

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            Pathfinder International and partners in Kenya and Uganda have implemented the Health of the People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project since 2011. The project aims to scale up its use of the population, health, and environment (PHE) community-development model at local, national, and regional levels by integrating PHE considerations in formal government development planning and policies. “PHE” refers to the PHE approach, which aspires to increase access to comprehensive reproductive health services and improve maternal and child health care practices while simultaneously improving natural resource management in project communities.

            On April 30th, 2019, HoPE-LVB project implementers and evaluators discussed the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) evaluation report on the model’s effectiveness and scalability. Released in April 2018, the USAID report addresses three key questions:

            • What are stakeholders’ perceptions of the HoPE-LVB project model’s added value to family planning and reproductive health, maternal and child health, livelihoods, governance, natural resources management, or conservation?
            • Has the HoPE-LVB project’s explicit focus on systematic planning for scale-up resulted in positive outcomes for the model’s institutionalization, sustainability, and expansion?
            • To what extent did the HoPE-LVB project achieve its objectives as measured by its key performance indicators/results?

            The evaluation of HoPE-LVB had been long anticipated, as the project was supported by cross-sectoral investments by multiple donors and represents a pioneering East African PHE project implemented at scale.

            The webinar, scheduled at 9:00 a.m. EST on April 30, 2019, was hosted by the PACE (Policy, Advocacy, and Communication Enhanced for Population and Reproductive Health) project. It included the following speakers:

            • Clive Mutunga of USAID provided introductory remarks on USAID’s support for PHE models globally and what USAID learned from the evaluation of HoPE-LVB.
            • Eileen Mokaya of Pathfinder International provided an overview of the HoPE-LVB project.
            • Richard Kibombo of Global Health Program Cycle Improvement Project (GH Pro) shared the evaluation’s results and his suggested next steps for PHE sustainability and scale-up.

            Year: 2019

            Source: Pathfinder International | Population Reference Bureau

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              Model households are a key aspect of Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB), an integrated Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) project with sites in Kenya and Uganda. Model households are trained in multiple project activities to illustrate behaviors that allow families to thrive without taking a toll on their environment and natural resources. Model households exhibit positive behaviors, including practicing sustainable agriculture and resource planning, adopting alternative livelihoods, prioritizing reproductive health and family planning, and investing in clean water for drinking, cooking, and washing.

              Year: 2016

              Source: Pathfinder International

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                A successful population, health, and environment (PHE) project requires the full and equal participation of women and girls and men and boys. In order to address the urgent, interconnected challenges in the Lake Victoria Basin—poor maternal and child health, a lack of access to contraception, dwindling fish supply, deforestation, and more—interventions must also work towards gender equality. Women must be able to exercise their right to sexual and reproductive health care services, including their ability to choose if or when to have children. They must be able to participate in income-generating activities, which improve their economic situation and better equip them to protect their families and the natural resources they depend on. The Health of People and the Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project works to promote gender equality. HoPE-LVB implements a range of activities, including training women’s and young mother’s groups on integrated health and conservation practices and conducting community dialogue sessions surrounding the intersection between gender, sexual and reproductive health, and the environment to bridge gender divides and encourage input and support from all community members.

                Year: 2014

                Source: Pathfinder International

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                  The Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project seeks to reduce threats to biodiversity conservation and ecosystem degradation in the LVB while simultaneously increasing access to family planning and reproductive health services, in order to improve maternal and child health in Kenya and Uganda. This brief discusses how HoPE-LVB builds the capacity of Beach Management Units (BMUs) to take collective responsibility to actively protect and restore fish stocks, their habitat, and the entire ecosystem they depend on. This goes hand-in-hand with harvest management— establishing who, when, and where to fish, as well as tracking and documenting the fish catches.

                  Year: 2016

                  Source: Pathfinder International

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                    This brief discusses the importance of advocacy at multiple scales to build policymaker support for the Health of People and the Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project. Staff and partners have engaged key district, national, and regional health and environment officials in Kenya and Uganda. The project goals are to: (1) increase stakeholders’ understanding of the interconnectedness of PHE issues and the benefits of the PHE approach; (2) increase the key stakeholders’ capacity to communicate about the PHE approach; and (3) provide platforms for policy dialogue to influence regional and national stakeholders to integrate PHE into their programs.

                    Year: 2016

                    Source: Pathfinder International

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